To caulk or not to caulk around toilet base?

Is it considered a good idea to seal around the base of a toilet? If so, what would you use? Silicon caulk? Plumbers putty?
The advantage to sealing is that it would keep water out and maybe make the toilet base easier to clean around and be more sanitary. A potential disadvantage is that you might not notice a leak around the wax ring if the base is sealed. I was thinking of sealing all but a small portion of the circumference as a compromise that would still alert me to a leak but that would still mostly seal the space between the toilet base and the tile and grout lines.
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blueman wrote:

We have had seals replaced in both baths, which have terrazzo floor. Both times the plumber used grout, not caulk. I suspect it is to give a firmer support to the toilet. It had grout previous to the repairs, as well. It isn't water-tight, so a leak will be evident.
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Whenever I set a toilet, I use Plaster of Paris under the toilet to make it seat better, then I wipe the excess around the outside edge to give it a claen look.
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On Tue, 23 Jun 2009 16:32:18 -0700 (PDT), Mike rock

Won't the plaster soak up urine?
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:

Around here, the usual custom with grout or caulk is to leave an inch or two in the back open, to give water a quick and easy way out, that will be noticed before it rots the floor, but still present a 'finished' look to the casual observer.
-- aem sends...
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wrote:

<snip>
Bingo!! That's what I was going to post. I have personally had the seal leak for me on two occassions. Had that joint have been caulked I'd have a floor and a joist rotted out. BTW, it can happen fast. I had a storm blow off a shingle this winter. When I discovered it there were four sheets of decking rotten. C & E
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I wouldn't...I don't like the look...Same for pedestal sinks...It just looks cheesy like your hiding a bad tile job or uneven floor. JMHO
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if you do feel the need to do this, use caulk. It's flexible & won't crumble over time.
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Tub and tile bathroom caulk. Seal the baseboard too. You never know when the next toilet overflow will happen.
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Aside from hiding leaks and the cheesy look, there's another disadvantage: It makes it harder to change out toilets in the future. It can be hard to predict how any goop/caulk is going to stick to, or even possibly damage or discolor a floor.
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The only time I've ever caulked a toilet was when the base was so badly warped there was a 1/4" gap in the front. I didn't want it to turn into roach central, so I shimmed the toilet so it would not rock, and then caulked it. Tacky, but it ended up looking and working just fine.

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P.S. If you still decide you must caulk, wait at least a month to make very, very, very sure that you are happy with the toilet.
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