Tire pressure

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Pavel314 wrote:

You only needed those for the older Chrysler products with the left handed lug nuts.
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Windell Stiefer wrote:

http://airgotireinflation.com/products/trailer-inflation/
Semis have high pressure air available but I suppose you could adapt the system.
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dpb wrote:

With truck tires I could usually pick up a tire that was 10 to 20 pounds low by thumping. They were 110 psi tires and you were thumping two side by side so you had an immediate comparison unless both were low.
Down 40 pounds or so almost anyone would pick up the duller sound. As for exactly 110 psi, I definitely wasn't that good.
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Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

The Feds predicted about 120 lives a year might be saved. With about 33,000 fatalities a year in the US that is hardly an overwhelming return on what they estimated would be a cost approaching 900 - 1000 million per year.
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http://www.nhtsa.gov/cars/rules/rulings/tpmsfinalrule.6/tpmsfinalrule.6.html

more

expect

People don't have to die to suffer serious financial consequences from accidents. While I don't particularly believe in the need for automatic tire pressure monitoring (people should be taught to regularly walk around their cars to inspect for low tires, etc) I suspect it would be very hard to calculate the true cost benefit of such systems. I also suspect the price of installing such systems will drop over time as new techniques evolve.
As for the price of gas, it's falling pretty fast around here as crude drops to nearly $60 a barrel. I am not surprised to see that the people who blamed Obama for high gas and oil prices aren't giving him any credit for the drops in price. (-: (Although realistically he had little to do with the rise or fall of oil prices.)
Ironically, the cheaper oil is roiling the stock market, given Putin $hit fits and causing the Saudis to try to flood the market and collapse the frackers. I suspect crude will soon be so cheap that the Excel pipeline will be economically unfeasible because of how expensive it will become to process the tar sands compared to fracking and OPEC fire sales. China is the only country so far that seems to be doing anything about the boom/bust cycle (a cycle that's been with oil since the first wildcatter). They're building up a national reserve so they can stock up at the current low prices and draw on that stockpile when prices invariably rise again in the future.
Some interesting details here at:
http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-12-01/can-the-us-fracking-boom-survive-with-oil-65-per-barrel?google_editors_picks=true
and:
http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-12-11/shale-oils-relentless-production-is-breaking-opecs-neck
<<shale producers have lowered their costs so much that in key fields they can make profits at $50 to $70 a barrel. That's above core OPEC members' exploration and production costs but below what many need to cover their government spending. . . . Singly the shale busters are nothing. Collectively, their breakneck production is breaking OPEC's neck. This is the remorseless, leaderless free market at work. . . . The Saudis' refusal last month to take one for the team is historic, says Michael Wittner, head of oil research at Soci?t? G?n?rale (GLE:FP) in New York. "That is such a tremendous, dramatic change," he says. "It's hard to think of a way to exaggerate how fundamental it is.">>
The dice are rolling - I can feel it!
--
Bobby G.



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dpb wrote:

The temperatures here tend to hover around 32 for much of the winter. Add in an inch or two of fresh snow, sometimes every night, and you have a perfect environment to turn roadways into ice rinks. All weather treads don't do much, nor is 4WD all that useful when all four are sliding.
The city is very religious about snow removal; God put it there and God will remove it when He feels like it. The main arteries wear down to pavement eventually, but the side streets just turns to ice, with nice frozen berms.
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It's a federal requirement goin back a number of years. I'm not at all impressed with whats offered OEM but after market sensons can be reliable but you get what you pay for.
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You were ripped. OEM replacementas rub ~ $50 all over the internet. Many tire dealerships will do the replacement for free.
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Why does the second set have to have them?
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On 12/13/2014 10:07 PM, NotMe wrote:

The vehicle is looking for input from those sensors. If it doesn't see them it goes full time into some sort of stability assist mode.
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Liz Megerle wrote:

I'm glad my car isn't that smart. Or dumb. I've come to like the traction/stability control in most cases but at times I'd like to be able to turn it off too.
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On Fri, 9 Jan 2015 06:30:01 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Mine have a calibrate button (in the car) that you press when the tires are inflated to my desired pressure. You act like your 41psi calibration is set in stone. Are you sure?
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On 01/09/2015 9:35 AM, Pat wrote: ...

I'd venture that's true in all systems that aren't actual pressure...certainly was in all the vehicles I've had before the switch to actual tire pressures (which I've found to be quite accurate and reliable on all my GM vehicles).
The setting procedure was quite varied between different models and years and manufacturers and some were extremely convoluted, but that's the way they all worked.
--




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Pat:
It's what the dealer told me. Like I said, I 'monitor' my own tires. Besides, how much gas does a tpms save when it allows tires to get 25% below recommended pressure?
If something's important, such as keeping up your tire pressure during fall to winter, you make the time for it, and get a decent gauge.
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On 01/09/2015 12:51 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I'd guess at least a decent chance that the dealer wasn't correct--that just wouldn't be a useful indication if that were it.
What was the vehicle/mode/year just to see if could "look it up" in an onwers manual to see what it says about setting/resetting the readout.
--


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dpb: 2008 Kia. Very likely batteries have died on these TPMS modules by now.
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On 01/09/2015 1:35 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Doesn't matter regarding how the system actually worked...
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wrote:

That depends on the car and the setup. Some notify when down as little as 2.5 PSI for sure - possibly some less.
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On Fri, 9 Jan 2015 10:51:08 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

A good gauge can be had for a buck or two. I've been using a dial gauge for the past 7-8 years. Think I paid 2-3 bucks. It's all mostly plastic, but it reads the same pressure as my stick gauges. It's easier to read than the sticks
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Vic Smith: +1
Metal(brass?) Sears dial gauge here with deflator button.
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