Tip: Baking Soda and Super Glue

Most of this video is about repairing a guitar nut, but I share it for what is shown in the first minute or so:
The hardness of Baking Soda mixed with Super Glue

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=slCMkvEfK_U

There are other videos showing the mixture used as a gap filler, etc. and then filed, shaped, etc.
One video notes that the mixture gets very hot, so you'll want to avoid getting any on your skin while it cures.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/18/2016 3:24 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Not a big deal. Filled plastics are extremely common. Baking soda is probably not a good filler if it gets wet. For a quick and dirty repair super glue is probably OK but repair would be more durable if epoxy were used.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/18/2016 01:24 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I used to build model R/C airplanes and that was a common trick. It makes a nice fillet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, May 18, 2016 at 10:57:29 PM UTC-4, rbowman wrote:

That's the type of application I was thinking of. When I used to build Soap Box Derby cars, we'd make the air-foil fillets with epoxy and West System 405 filler. That's fine for "large" applications, but for small applications like yours, small batches of epoxy and fillet blend would be over-kill (wasteful).
I'm going to store this tip away for future use.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/18/2016 09:16 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

It would be a little slow too. When you're building a wing there are a lot of rib/spar joints and you can move right along with CA.
If you're doing something that requires a lot of CA hit the hobby stores. They have a lot of flavors and relatively large quantities. I can tell you when you're reinforcing the root joint with mesh and slathering on the CA, it gets a little intense. Who needs proper ventilation?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 12:49:29 AM UTC-4, rbowman wrote:

Slow can be OK when you have to sculpt the fillet. I'll play before I actually use this mixture, but I'm just curious:
How much time do you have to work the BS & SG mixture before it cures too much to work?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/19/2016 06:36 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

About .032 seconds with most CA. I mostly used Hot Stuff, which is fast anyway. There are thicker, slower CA glues but if I was doing something that required working the joint I'd go with epoxy.
Baking soda is an accelerator so it's counter-productive if you want something to be workable. You can sand it after the fact but you're not going to be doing any sculpting.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 10:04:15 AM UTC-4, rbowman wrote:

So for building fillets, you would "sculpt" the BS as much as possible and then just drizzle on the CA?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DerbyDad03 wrote:

With super glue, that is the only way you could. You don't have to use baking soda, BTW, any fine powder will do...talc, pumice, wood sanding dust...whatever.
If you want to form the mass prior to its hardening, you would do better using thickened epoxy (same sort of materials to thicken, personally, I like talc). The epoxy starts to set much more slowly, needs 24 hours minimum to fully cure.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 10:33:39 AM UTC-4, dadiOH wrote:

...as shown in the video I posted.

...as I have already addressed earlier in this thread.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/19/2016 08:11 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Yes. It wasn't a work of art, just a way to fill any gaps. Opaque MonoKote covers a multitude of sins.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/19/2016 12:50 AM, rbowman wrote:

Ambroid not good enough for you? Never tried CA on balsa. You should have told me 40 years ago.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/19/2016 07:03 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

50 years ago or so I used Ambroid, jap tissue, and dope. If nothing else it was good for a buzz. When I revisited R/C aircraft in the '80s it was CA and iron-on MonoKote. I already have too many projects but if I got into again I'd go retro although I've heard Ambroid is almost extinct. Do you know its history?
http://www.ottertooth.com/Canoe_pages/ambroid.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/19/2016 10:31 PM, rbowman wrote:

Never knew that.
In the 70s I worked for the sister company of Sullivan Products (Pylon Brand) so I was able to get most anything for RC free or 50% off from distributors. Fun hobby.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/19/2016 09:39 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I was doing contract work in the '80s and even if I was working in Boston I'd just rent a apartment, stay down during the week, and go home to New Hampshire weekends. Building R/C models was something to do that was fairly portable and didn't require a huge number of tools. Flying them was another matter. I'd go electric next time, skip the fuel, glow plugs, balky engines, noise, and so forth.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 19 May 2016 23:10:03 -0600, rbowman wrote:

I'm just a bit curious about this. Has anyone ever put one of those little engines into a roller blade wheel? It seems to be an obvious experiment.
I guess the main problrm would be synchonising the left & right drives.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/19/2016 11:41 PM, Mike Duffy wrote:

Back in the day I recall someone adapted a model engine to a push scooter sort of like the modern razers. At least it drove a wheel.
https://books.google.com/books?id=9NgDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA130&lpg=PA130&dq=model+airplane+engine+scooter&source=bl&ots=YPz0ptuCVD&sig=THN7jbzr_jvBHhnyBJZtfGD4-OY&hl=en&sa=X&ved hUKEwjsv83r6ujMAhWGej4KHc8FARgQ6AEIcTAM#v=onepage&q=model%20airplane%20engine%20scooter&flse
http://tinyurl.com/zscob33
How many ways could a prop driven scooter go wrong?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 20 May 2016 01:11:57 -0700 (PDT), Uncle Monster wrote:

Thanks, Uncle. I guess I should have invested a few seconds into a web search before I posted.
My favorite was the outboard motorized unicyle, but I find myself thinking that a puller would be safer than a pusher.
Also, what about a big drone on a rope? (Shrouded for safety, of course.) You could have a jet engine as well. (Whoops, I just realized that behind a jet is problematic.)
--
http://mduffy.x10host.com/index.htm

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.