[time sensitive] drilling through tile


My client has prospective in-laws coming in on Saturday, and I've got a hot date by 6 pm Friday at the latest, so I've got to get squared away on this within 12 hours or so.
I have to drill through bathroom tile so as to be able to fasten one of those crescent shower curtain deals.
I was thinking I would drill a small pilot hole, then come after with the rotary drill and a hammer drill bit sans hammer. I was thinking the bits that I tend to have around would be perfect forthis, as they would otherwise be used for tap-cons.
My client has said that there is backerboard behind. Instead of trying to throw in an anchor, I would bring on a 3/32, and piss on it, use my own screws. Their's aren't even ferromagnetic.
All I gotta do is get two screws fastened level--up and down, one inch apart, on either side.
How about going into the grout instead?
Anyways, your experience and comments are appreciated.
--
Uno

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I'd use 3/16 carbide bit and plastic anchors. I'd also use SS screws. Hold the non hammer drill real steady on the tile, the glaze is very slippery. Once through the glaze, use the hammer, but only press lightly so the tile doesn't chip, and before you even start, do the tile prayer.
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Do NOT go into the grout.
I've had good results with carbide tipped bits, meaning that I've not cracked any tiles.
I start with the smallest carbide drill I can find, which is 1/8", then enlarge that hole with a 3/16" or 1/4" carbide, depending on the anchor size I'm using.
Put a piece of masking tape over the hole target - drill through that, and don't be too aggressive when drilling.
I use plastic anchors - they're very forgiving in this sort of application, and use stainless steel screws to fasten the brackets.
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How about Velcro or glue it down, a sheet metal screw with phillips head or one for a socket is better than a wood screw, the right screwdriver or socket will hold the the screw and no need to predrill the wood.
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This response was posted to the other thread about the pencil can, I dont know how it happened.
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Rodman brand masonry carbide drill. High speed. Yer welcome.
Steve
visit my blog at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com
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Uno wrote:

I've never had any problem hammer drilling tile. I've anchored a few bath cabinets and a full shower door in tile, in all cases hammer drilling through the tile with a 1/4" carbide tip bit in my hammer drill. The key I find is the manually hold the bit in place and start the drill very slow while it makes it's way through the glaze layer. Once past the glaze you have a decent divot to keep you centered and you can take your hand away from the bit and move up to normal speed. I used normal plastic anchors and screws for these applications, not ones supplied with the items being mounted, but quality ones from an electrical supply house. None of the tiles ever cracked.
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Use a center punch 1st...it will make a small chip to remove the glazing. Then a carbide bit will go through like butter.
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Bingo. We have a winner! Wall tile is very soft. Nicking the glazing will stabilize the bit until the hole gets started and then it'll go right though. Do *not* hammer drill tile. There is no need and a lot of downside potential.
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keith wrote:

Alright, thx all for replies.
My method will be 1) prayer of supplication 2) use center punch to chip the glaze 3) 1/4" carbide tip with hammer drill sans hammer 4) insert plastic anchor 5) fasten with stainless steel screws 6) prayer of thanksgiving 7) hot date with jenny
This will be like falling off a log. -- Uno
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re: "7) hot date with jenny
This will be like falling off a log."
umm...errr...nevermind.
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#1 is good.
#2 I prefer using an abrasive rather than a punch to remove the glaze. Just a touch with a grinding/sharpening stone will do and not crack.
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Perfect! I have used this method many, many times (except no.7) and have not broken a tile.
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I'm sure you've already fixed the problem but just for the future:
Don't you people know that there's a special bit to drill tile? Looks a little like a teardrop on the end of a round shaft. Chuck it in a battery-powered drill; push against wall at point where you want the hole (hard); start drill very slowly and it'll cut you hole like magic. No center punch (good way to ruin tile). Comes in appropriate sizes to fasten shower and bathroom fittings generally. See HD or Lowes in the tool department.
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On Fri, 30 Jul 2010 22:43:56 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.gov wrote:

Special bits aren't needed for wall tile (floor tile is a whole different kettle). All that's needed is a nick in the glaze. A nick, smaller than the drill bit, even, isn't going to "ruin" the tile.
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Center punch on tile? What could possibly go wrong?
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On Fri, 30 Jul 2010 15:31:31 -0700 (PDT), mike

Replace the tile? I've drilled porcelain tile to mount a bi-fold door pin mount.
Just a variable speed drill, and a good bit. The bit tried to walk and dance for a moment, but I handled that.
I've _never_ heard of using a ""center punch". Crack!
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Oren wrote:

Yeah I couldn't hit the tile with the center punch. The carbide tip was all I needed.
6) There's a lot to be thankful for. A day without disasters. Friends, family, the enchanting land I live in.
7) Woo-hoo.
See ya
--
Uno

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New Mexico?!
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On 7/30/2010 5:31 PM, mike wrote:

I've used a small automatic center punch and my Bosch hammer drill for many years to drill anchor holes in tile walls. The drill I own has a very high cyclic rate and I've had no problems with any of the tiles breaking or cracking.
TDD
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