Tile over plywood


I want to put a two foot strip of tile around my wood stove at my cabin. It is going to go on top of plywood or particle board, or whatever wood is under the carpet.
Do one use an adhesive or grout to get the tiles to stick to the wood? Or adhesive, then grout the joints. And what keeps the grout joints from working loose as the floor flexes? Is there flexible grout?
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve B spake thus:

I'd use "wonderboard", the 1/2" cement-fiberglass board available everyhere, as underlayment for the tile. Not good to tile over wood, as it expands and contracts with moisture and will eventually cause the tile to work loose.
--
"In 1964 Barry Goldwater declared: \'Elect me president, and I
will bomb the cities of Vietnam, defoliate the jungles, herd the
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You have carpet in a cabin?
It's a cabin. Get 3 big inch-thick pieces of slate or granite the right size, and just set them in place and let gravity do the work. Hold them in place, if needed, with a strip of hardwood screwed to the floor around the outside. More important, what is under the stove and behind it? In the old days, we used to use sheets of asbestos board, looked and worked about like the current cement backer board. Rather than a ring, I'd seriously look at pulling the stove loose long enough to put a continuous something underneath, the better to have no cracks to catch ashes or sparks, and to make cleanup easier.
But if you have your heart set on tile- same rules as tiling a bathroom- floor has to be stiff, usually done by screwing down a layer of cement backer board. In the old days, they framed the floor an inch or so lower there, and put down a mortar bed with chicken wire in it, and laid the tile over that. Some people do get away with using mastic for ceramic, but I'm really not sure what they use for grout to keep it from cracking.
aem sends...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The floor in that corner of the room is four inches thick of concrete. I believe it is a form poured base for a wood burning stove that is then set in place once the cabin is framed and flooring installed. It is like a square with one corner triangle trimmed off. Carpet comes up to the concrete base. I want to make a two foot strip of tile between the concrete and tile. Back wall is natural stone about six feet out each direction from the corner. Sorry I wasn't clear.
The corner that the stove sits in is pretty safe, having a concrete base and stone walls.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Here's the *right* way to do the job, however you may opt to do something else:
Since you have two floor types meeting (concrete and wood) there will be potentially more flex in the floor at that particular spot and the floor should be stiffened before applying tile.
You need to first clean the area you're going to tile thoroughly. Put a coat of thinset (mortar) down with a 1/4" trowel, then place hardibacker or cement board (I prefer hardibacker, much easier to work with) down over the thinset while it's wet. Screw down the hardibacker in the indicated locations on the board (every 6") with special screws (designed to penetrate the cement board/hardibacker and countersink themselves.)
Now after waiting at least 24 hours, apply another coat of thinset with the same trowel you used before over the hardibacker and set your tile. (Of course, this assumes you have already laid out your tile pattern first.) Wait 24 hours or more before grout.
Now that's the *right* way to do the job and it's the way I do *ALL* my tile floors. To me, the right way is the only way. Sure saves trouble later.
-Jeff Steve B wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

We're talking about 20 sf that will not even be walked on. I'm going to glue it down to the wood, grout the joints, and put a strip of extrusion to cover up the carpet edge.
No need for rocket surgery here.
Steve

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hmmm I never thought of it as "rocket science" or "brain surgery" or "rocket surgery" as you put it. Speaking of mixed metaphors, you never mentioned that the floor wouldn't be walked on in your first post - if that's the case, you might get away with Mastik and modified grout, but beware, walking on it isn't the only means of movement. Floors expand and contract with temperature and moisture changes. Wait a few months and look at your grout joints and you will notice little cracks all along the tile, and eventually the grout will crack too. But then again, you don't really care... it's just a cabin.
-Jeff Steve B wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Wrong again. It's not just a cabin. It's MY cabin. An out of body experience that borders on the time line dimensions of the Twilight Zone.
But, yes, it's just a piece of two foot strip of tile I want to put down to keep the hot ashes from making black spots in the polyester berber carpet.
The only time it is trod on is to put logs in the fire, or to clean up. Not a common walkway.
It is not JUST any old border, but one that I want to select just the RIGHT tile, and put it down to complement the ambience of the room. Rough sawn, knotty pine, slight smell of PineSol, mothballs, all that goes with a summer cabin.
If it were " just a cabin ", things would be much different.
I'm getting ready to post photos to a website, and to alt.binaries.photos.original, and, as you will see, it's pretty cool.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hey, you should see some of the luxuries in die-hard ice fishing shanty's.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve B wrote:

I did the same thing at my cabin. I put down 1/2" ceramic tile over plywood , glueing it down with construction adhesive, grouting the joints, then trimming the outside edges with quarter round. Been in use for 12 years now with no cracks of any kind.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A friend I just had dinner with said the same thing. This guy is a retired contractor. That's what he said. Put it down with Mastic or Liquid Nails, leave space for grout, grout, then trim it out with carpet capping.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve B wrote:

Use mastic, available at any tile store. It will stick well to wood.
Yes, concrete board is better but tile was laid over plywood for a long time. Still is. _______________

Elsewhere you said you had a thick slab in that area under the wood. Why should the ply floor flex? If it is not securely fastened, fasten it.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.