Tile floor advice

I just posted a question about kitchen cabinets, I have another one about tile floors. The kitchen we are doing over has tile floors which my wife does not like and wants to replace with something else. What's the best way to do it? Dig up the tiles? put something over them? The house has settled since the tiles were put it and things ae not exactly true with a large crack across the tile floor,
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Hard to say since no one can see it.
Starting over with a fresh bed of thinset is always a better prospect for longevity.
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Floor tiles made of porcelan, not ceramic, can be installed over an existing tile floor. Porcelan is much stronger and will not be subject to cracking.

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I would remove the old tiles, fix the crack and start over.
otherwise your new floor will crack again:(
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Rusht Limpalless wrote:

Stronger, yes, but still brittle. If the substrate has a large crack, whatever tile you put over it will crack. The OP needs to determine the cause of the crack and whether it is still moving. At the very least an isolation membrane should be put down prior to tiling.
Do the homework first. Tiling isn't cheap - either going down or being ripped up.
R
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colorful interlocking rubber playroom /exercise mats from the wholesale club will give you anti-fatigue and warmth to your bare feet.
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There is no way to judge this situation without seeing it. You need a professional to personally consult with you about why your floor has a "large crack" and why the floor is continuing to settle. With those kind of structual problems, maybe you should consider a more resilient flooring like vinyl or 'pergo-type' wood. As is often mentioned by others on this forum, tile requires a VERY rigid subfloor.
thetiler
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