The unwanted pole

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Been there. My brother-in-law's Italian. I mean real Italian right from Palermo. He would "Gedda da camera to takeuh da pitch."
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You hear about the kid who was half Jewish, and half Italian. What a mixed up mess. He never knew if he was Carmen or Cohen.
You know what noise Italian helecopters make?
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
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Clickety Clack ????
:-)
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Represent your post. :)
Get it right!
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Nil wrote:

Nobody else said it, so I will- just keep bashing at the base of the pole with a sledgehammer. If it is thin-wall pipe (like most of the rusty clothesline poles I have removed over the years), the pipe will collapse, or at least lose its grip on the concrete. If I was replacing a rusted-off pole, I would just bash down on the stub of the pole, and punch it through the concrete. If you cut the pole off with an angle grinder or Sazall, that would be how to proceed with breaking up the lump, or at least getting it flat. The concrete is usually a mushroom shape, and seldom extends below the bottom of the pipe- you can usually push it through and down.
Sledgehammers are wonderful things, but be sure to stretch and warm up first. And if you haven't hefted a 12-pounder since teenage years, best to find a teenager. Bet him $20 he can't do it.
-- aem sends...
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A reciprocating saw should work at getting it close to being flush. The Ryobi electric models are inexpensive. I would rent a small jackhammer and demo at least the upper portion of the concrete.
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On Wed, 10 Dec 2008 21:34:08 +0000 (UTC), Nil

I would suggest hiring someone with a backhoe to take it out. It may cost less than you think.
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First, thank you for providing some very good information and clues. Lots of people write in about such stuff and don't even give a clue.
First, you apparently have a pretty big plug of concrete there. If you want to try pulling it out, you can use the jack suggestion, or strap a 4x4 on it for added strength, and hook a chain to it tight and pull on the 4x4 side. Hook the chain about four foot up to get leverage. If it starts bending, go to plan b.
Plan b is cutting it off flush to the ground. Any grinder will do it. Or a cutting torch. Get a hose and blow out the stuff inside the hole, let it dry, and fill with concrete. You'll still have the concrete plug there, but not the hole.
Plan c. Backhoe, and you can either dig it out, or rig it up and pull it out straight up.
I did several of these when I was doing steel work.
Sometimes, they just get to a point where they pop out, and the concrete isn't as big as once thought. Other times, the concrete is bigger, and it all depends on what you want to do with the space as to whether you take it all out or just cut off the pole.
Get a cheap grinder. You'll use it for lots of other stuff, too. Or go to the pawn shop and get a good used one for about the same price, and it will last longer.
Steve
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By chance if you should go the cutting torch route... you need to be absolutely positive the post doesn't contain any water. You don't want molten metal splattered all over you, bystanders, pets or your property.
Good Luck!
Erik
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Good point, that doesn't sound like much fun. I'm thinking the $20 angle grinder method will be the cheapest solution and reasonably easy. I expect a torch would cost more, and I don't know what else I'd ever do with it.

Thanks!
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wrote in alt.home.repair:

Just be sure to have goggles and a dust mask on. There will be a lot of stuff flying around. Get extra cutting wheels as I think a four inch steel pipe may require more than one. Don't have any bystanders or cars nearby as a broken piece of the blade can do serious damage. There will also be a lot of sparks so don't have anything flammable in the area. Use a grinding disk and not a cut off wheel for grinding down the base. That four inch pipe will be heavy when it comes down so you might want to figure a way to brace it or catch it.
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alt.home.repair:

It's really a thin-walled tube and not very tall, rather than, like, a thick iron pipe. It should be pretty light, and I think the grinder will go through it like butter. Then I can pound down whatever's left with a hammer. Then, next spring when the ground thaws, I'll try breaking up at least enough of the concrete with a sledgehammer to cover it with some soil.
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wrote in

If it's that thin, you can cut it off 1/4-1/2" from the ground with a hacksaw, and pound the remained into the hole with a hammer. Or, us a hammer and cold chisel to cut it enough that you can break it off. That can get you mostly at or below ground level.
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On Wed, 10 Dec 2008 21:34:08 +0000 (UTC), Nil

Angle grinder would make quick work of it. Personally, I'd remove the concrete, replace with topsoil and seed.
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Sawsall if you can borrow or have one. Or hacksaw, just cut partway thru and bend to break at cut. Then use a sledge hammer to pound down the "stump."

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