The Shingles That Were Blown Off

have a strip of cellophane-like tape over the black adhesive.
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Jack W wrote:

That tape is simply there to keep the shingles separated while they are in the bundle. You do not need to remove that strip and it has nothing to do with the shingles blowing off.
I will bet that the shingles were installed with staples, right?
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Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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I want to see that answer too.
When I redid this house this summer some parts were nails and some staples. The ones with staples you could get the corner of a section up with the shingle rake, grab the corner with both hands and pull up a whole section. That says something...
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systems. When I had my house and garage re-shingled the crew complained a lot about how hard it was to get the stapled shingles off the garage.
Don Young
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Don Young wrote:

We have the same complaint from our roofers, but not for the reason you are thinking. Shingles with nails are easier to remove because the demo tools will hook the nails and they will come out cleanly, while the staples have a tendency to pull out one leg of the staple, leaving nothing for the shingle tool to grab. They then have to be pounded down or removed with a pair of kleins or end cutters.
The shingles come off easily, the staples don't. While on a roof with nails, the shingles often pull out the nails and the remaining nails can be removed with the same tool.
Having done thousands of roof repairs, I will tell you what I have on my roof; nails.
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Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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Does anything below your waist not hurt any more? :-)

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Red Green wrote:

Back when I was still working on my tools, I had a roofing dept. in my company. We did mostly reroofing (we were doing a lot of insurance work). I also did a lot of work at apartment complexes. I began to do roof repairs for leaks. After a heavy rain (and usually while it was still raining) the calls for leak repairs would start. I would get a call from a complex that they had 4 leaks. When it stopped raining, I would load up 3 extension ladders and head out to the first complex. Although they originally called in 4 leaks, by the time I got there more tenants would have called the office and they would hand me a list of 70 leaks or more.
Each one of them meant getting a key to the apartment, so I could go inside and look at where it was leaking. Then set up the ladder and go up on the roof (most were 3-story, so a 32' ladder minimum) to see where it was leaking and fix it. Back down the ladder and on to the next one. Then, on to the next apartment complex. After a couple of weeks of doing this every day, all day, I am surprised that I even HAVE anything below my waist!
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Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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On Feb 11, 3:14 pm, Windswept@Home (Jack W) wrote:

So are you going to indicate how many of these shingles blew off? You were looking for some advice in the other thread you started and it was difficult to scope out your problem with the information you provided. Obviously, if you're seeing the adhesive line on some of the blow-downs, this would appear to be a little more serious than some tabs breaking off.
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