texturing my walls

i want to texture my inside walls.. i've never done it before, but i'm pretty sure that i could do it, it doesn't look that difficult (once i buy the equipment). i already have a nice air compressor... i plan on an orange peel texture. has anyone had any experience doing this?
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It sounds like you are planning on using a texture gun.
Get some scrap drywall. Mix up your taping mud wet enough to pour out of a 5 gallon bucket, but don't get silly. Turn the compressor down to about 30 PSI. Splatter away, try different tips/orifices. Try one with really heavy globs, when they are almost completely dry, wipe down with a wide taping knife (if your leaving tracks, it is still too wet) Known as knockdown - you may like it. Do not keep spraying til the wall is one color - way too much compound and texture. The walls won't look right until painted. If you can stop by a house under construction to watch, it will be worth a thousand words.
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My Son-in-law does Drywall and texturing for a living. This doesn't make me an expert, but by listening I pick up a thing or two.
I have heard the term "orange peel" related to rolled on texture, as with a paint rooler with a decent knap. Not a deep knap, but somewhere in the middle as I remember hearing it.
If your going to "spray "on your texture, You can experiment a bit to get a texture you like, but remember, whatever the texture before painting, it will be dulled slightly by the painting process. For instance, If you do the Crows foot type stuff and you have some pretty tall ridges in the texture, when the paint goes on, it will wet the texture a bit and will kinda smoothe out the sharpness. Make sense?
Anyway, I rather like a lot of different textures I have seen, and would be willing to try something other than the , (if you consider it simple to do orange peel ) simple textures and do something that will hide defects in the tape and bedding work, and any other types of prep defects...............thin spots and rough spots and the like.
The easiest to do is definitely the crows foot type texturing, but it's likely the most boring of the textures done nowadays.
The best looking for my house will likely be what is called "icing" by the SIL,( he loves these neat names for this stuff, it makes him feel like he's a god or something ) which is a look something like icing a cake.
My home is a Spanish ranch style house by fox and jacobs..............so the "splatter and drag" type texture would probably *fit* best for the general style of the house, because it has a stucco look to it.............for this type, you use that funky mud shooting machine and splatter the walls with it and drag a trowel over it to flatten out the high spots..............looks really nice too. Might actually do this one after all is said and done.
These are just a few of the many types of normal textures available. Don't let anybody tell you they are terribly "special" either. unless you do it yourself..............then you can tell everybody how special it is!................LOL
hope this is a step in helping ............I figure not much though.
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wrote:

When I textured some walls in my house, I used a deep nap roller and joint compound. Much easier and much less messy than a sprayer. Shorter learning curve. Less clean up, too. I strongly suggest looking into this first. Try it out on a scrap piece of drywall for looks. If you want a flatter effect, lay it on with a deep nap roller and then flatten it with a smoother roller -- or even try a wide brush.
A gentle sugggestion: a little texture in a house goes a long way. If you do the whole interior, or the entire living room and dining room, say, you run the risk of making the house look like the inside of a cave, or a cheap motel room. This gets old pretty fast and changing it is a lot of work. I did just a little alcove in my house -- a "sunroom." It looks very nice, and it covered up a lot of old alligatored paint, but I never would have done even the whole first floor this way.
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W > i want to texture my inside walls.. i've never done it before, but i'm W > pretty sure that i could do it, it doesn't look that difficult (once i buy W > the equipment). i already have a nice air compressor... i plan on an orange W > peel texture. has anyone had any experience doing this?
We had professionals do a couple of the ceilings here in orange peel. Don't recall the details on the application but do recall they shut off the ceiling light and fans so the mud would dry consistently: the heat from the light bulb hanging by the wires in the center of the room would cause the mud to dry faster, as would a fan.
I know you wrote walls and I'm describing ceilings but figure the hints would be the same.
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