Terms: cement lime sand mortar grout thinset concrete

On Mon, 30 Jan 2012 13:28:42 -0500, dadiOH wrote:

In another thread, I confused everyone by being wholly ignorant about the terms concrete vs cement vs mortar vs grout.
So how's this first pass at clarifying:
Cement --> aka "Portland cement" - it's the sticky gray glue. Lime --> aka white "hydrated lime" - prevents sand & cement separation. Sand --> mixed with cement - I think it gives strength to cement. Mortar --> cement + lime + (rough) sand (rougher mix for stone & brick) Grout --> cement + lime + (smoother) sand (finer mixture for tile) Concrete: --> cement + lime + sand + gravel (courser mixture)
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Chuck Banshee wrote:

Not sticky until wateris added.

Makes the mix more plastic

Grout --> cement + lime + (smoother) sand (finer mixture for

Concrete: --> cement + lime + sand + gravel (courser mixture)
Gravel is pebbles. Water rounded pebbles. For concrete, you want crushed rock...stuff with angles in a variety of sizes; AKA "aggregate".
OK with minor addendums :)
--

dadiOH
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On Mon, 30 Jan 2012 20:24:32 +0000 (UTC), Chuck Banshee

As a kid, I was raised calling concrete "cement", as in "a cement sidewalk". While in construction terms, this is not the correct word, a lot of people call it CEMENT. It's just one of those slang terms that we all have to live with. Heck, I often see real estate ads that state something like "home has a cement driveway".
Using the correct wording, cement is actually portland cement. (which is a dry powder and not sticky at all until it's wettened). But the word cement is used for other types of glues too. Model airplane cement was a common phrase in the 1960's. (Do they still sell model airplane kits?). Flooring adhesives have been labelled as "cement" too, as are other glues........
It's just one of those english words that has gotten twisted and turned, and may require asking the speaker exactly what they are saying. Yet, sometimes it's just common sense. Model airplanes are assembled using portland cement or concrete, so it's obvious what is being stated.
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I think you really need to get yourself down to the local library and get a good book. It's pointless troubling your head about these matters without a basic grounding. If you find something in the book you don't understand get on here
Or go to Wikipedia which is good on technical topics. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cement http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concrete http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grout
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