tension on a chainsaw's chain

I recently got a Craftsman chainsaw. The starting instructions on the the saw tell you to adjust the tension on the chain before starting. The saw didnt come with a manual so I dont know how tight the chain should be? Should I be able to pull the chain away from the bar at all or just make it as tight as I can? Thanks.
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1800 235 5878 sears ... my manual says loosen bar mounting nuts until finger tight.Turn adjusting screw clockwise until chain contacts bottom of rail then 1/4more you model may be different
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (mark Ransley) wrote in message

tighten it until you can't pull it around by hand easily then back it off until you can. that's perfect. the whole how far can i pull it away thing is bullshit!!! i worked on logging saws and all others for about 7 years . doesn't mean i know everything but i won't give advice unless i'm sure of it. Chip
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Chippy daddy I AM read Craftsman chainsaw MANUAL and QUOTED IT.
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never tried doing that way chip. I don't look at how high it pull away from the chain or how many drive links show when lifting from bar I do it by feel when turning it but never did the tighten then loosen off. Ill give it a try and see how it works for me, if it goes good thanks for the tip.
For the the person who are this is my 1st saw I would recommend the other posts that follow the lift chain etc. until you get a feel of what is proper tension. Onlt tid bit Ill ad is when adjsuting the chain make sure the bar is not allowed to rest down, hold handle in air with tip of bar resting on work area when adjusting, & pull chain around , recheck tension, also check tension often when useing as chains tension changes while in use. (ensure the saw is turned off of course)
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The descriptions vary from brand to brand. A good general rule for a cold chain is, should look tight (no sag on the lower part) and when you lift on the upper part the guides should still be in the bar. About 2 nickels worth of lift is another way I have seen this expressed.
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The way you test a chain for proper tension is to pinch and lift it up by one of the links. If you can see more than three of the guide teeth exposed then it is too loose. Less than three and it is too tight. The guide teeth are the ones that run in the grove of the bar. The chain should glide gently to a stop seconds after you release the trigger. If it stops suddenly then it is also too tight. There should be no sagging of the chain while in use.
To tell if your chain is sharp, inspect the wood particles that it is throwing off. If they look like sawdust or powder, the chain needs sharpening. If they look more like chips or shavings then it is still sharp. Never let your blade touch the dirt as this will dull it instantly. A chain needs to be sharpened prior to major projects. I usually get about a half a cord of cutting out of one sharpening if I don't hit any dirt or rocks. Let's be careful out there.
Doug
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Depends on the bar. Hardnose requires looser chain than sprocketnose, and more frequent adjustment. I've learned over the years to adjust as follows: Hardnose: slacken adj, then tighten until max chain droop is 1/8". Sprocket: no droop.
Of course, while doing this, you must keep bar position fixed relative to power-head.
HTH, John
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