temporarily moving my water heater

Getting a new furnace with air finally........
but the basement has water troubles, the base of the old furnace is badly rusted.
to facilitate the interior french drain install i am going to have to remove or relocate my hot water tank temporarily for the drain work.
once finances recover a little i want to replace that heater which currently vents up the chimney, to a sealed combustoion 95% condensing heater. shopping for that today. DONT want a tankless!
anyone move a tank successfully? ours s over 7 years old, a 50 gallon 75,000 btu model.
if $ were no object i would replace it too right now but prefer to wait till later this summer
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On Tue, 17 Jun 2008 04:45:01 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

If you are able to install a new hot water heater, you certainly should be able to move an existing one. Drain it to lighten the load. Disconnect. Move. Reconnect. If you have all the fittings and parts, should take half a day max.
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my concern is my old heater springing a leak from being moved.
moving it will be no problem, its a temporary install, with flexible lines ore a few days so french drain install and wall can be painted.
`
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Just be gentle and don't put too much of a strain on any portionpof the heater.
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follow up the move went fine, drain installed.
connecting the tank back up took a couple hours, since the tank feed lines had to be moved, for furnce install.
many years ago the original tank was behind the furnace.
new supply lines no longer rube goldberg:)
T&P valve dripped a little, hopefully that will clear up on its own.
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If you have a dampness problem in the basement, don't let the installers sit a new furnace directly on the floor. Mortar in four concrete bricks/blocks to fit under the corners to lift it off the floor so that air can circulate and reduce the rusting. At some point you may also want to add some plastic sheets between the steel furnace shell and the concrete bricks to seal any dampness that may soak through the brick. It will go a long way to reducing rusting of the metal, you may also want to do the same for your new water heater if it sits directly on the floor.

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