Tempered glass alternatives?

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There's a good chance that the shower door is still covered under warrantee.
Don't do anything until you check.


Toughened appears to be another word for tempered.


Lexan is _very_ tough, but not only is it _quite_ expensive (you're probably looking at well over $200 for a shower door in lexan alone), the surface is relatively soft and scratches/scuffs very easily. Even toothpaste or baking soda can scratch it.
Plexiglass is cheaper, less tough (will shatter much more readily than lexan) but has a somewhat more scratch resistant surface.
Tempered glass probably is the best choice for a transparent (or nearly transparent) shower door. Laminated glass may well be a bit better, but I suspect a lot more expensive, and likely easier to break.
Tempered glass shower doors (aside from manufacturing defects) is able to stand up to hammer blows. Breaking tempered glass is surprisingly difficult to do (unless you know the trick ...)
I wouldn't consider clear plastic for a shower door because of the scratch/scuff problem.
If you don't need transparent, I'd suggest an opaque fiberglass panel of some sort.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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On 8-Feb-2004, snipped-for-privacy@nortelnetworks.com (Chris Lewis) wrote:

Not a bad idea, but it could be translucent as well - nearly clear if well made.
Mike
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Chris Lewis wrote:

Thats why its not used for car windscreens anymore. The driver comes off far worse than when hitting laminated glass.

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As one other poster mentioned, you could use laminated glass. If it's too thick to fit into the existing door frame, you might have to buy metal to build a new frame. Most commercial glass shops can provide the materials, or do it for you.
It's an industry myth that tempered glass breaks into nice safe little bits. A significant percentage of those little bits are little spears - capable of doing very serious damage. Ask any police officer, fire fighter, or paramedic that has attended vehicle accident sites how "safe" tempered glass really is. There's a VERY good reason it's prohibited for use in windshields. In almost every country on earth (outside North America) it's also prohibited in ALL vehicle windows. The only reason it's still permitted in the U.S. is the companies that make tempered glass maintain an intensive lobby to ensure they can sell it.
Most U.S. states have even been convinced to enforce tempered glass for passage doors. Almost everywhere else permits laminated as an equivalent alternative. Other places don't have the same lobbyists. Tempered is stronger - laminated is safer. That's why most glaziers refer to it as "safety" glass.
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Should fit ok, most toughened panels (at least in Australia) are 5mm, so 5.38 or 6.38 (without the gasket, neutral cure silicone it in) is reasonably easy to fit (for a handyperson, use a pro glass shop if not).

snip
Yeah, both lam and toughened is a Grade A safety glazing material in commercial and domestic situations here in Australia, toughened can be very sharp and it would be very painful to walk on it for sure, but the idea is no big shards to cut arteries.
We still have toughened in autos for side and rear glass, but have had lam in windscreens now for many years.
snip
--
Regards,
Les
e-mail munged, remove the obvious to reply direct
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what is needed to atach hardware?
Tom Baker
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Mark wrote:

There are plenty of plastics that you can substitute for glass and never know it just from looking at it.
Plexiglas and Lexan are good alternatives, are easy to work with, and can be purchased at your local home depot.
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After reading every post in this thread, I believe I have come up with the answer!
Two words...................................
Shower curtain.
You can get em in any color you want, You can even get em with dingle balls!
Randy Hansen SC Glass Tech Scam Diego Comi-fornia
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Copying your original message. The two primary flat plastics are Acrylic (Plexiglas) and Cyano .sflsdjf (Lexan) Plexiglas is commonly available at hardware stores and is cut on the same device (with a different cutter) as glass. Lexan is much more expensive and is generally available only from plastic companies in anything larger than a foot square (when used for router tables, for example) I paid nearly $100 for four 1/8" pieces to make up two 3' x 5' storm windows on the front of my house facing the street across an open porch in a mildly risky neighborhood. The other windows, without the porch, are 5-8 feet off the ground and their storm windows are acylic or glass. Lexan is tougher than Plexi but softer and it will sag more than Plexi with a constant load (as in router table plates with the router attached.) Plexi is brittle and will crack if wrongly drilled or hit and will get more brittle with age. Failure is less catestrophic than glass usually a few big pieces.
--
Mike Firth
Hot Glass Bits Furnace Working Website
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