Telephone Service

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The Daring Dufas wrote:

Musta been more than a dozen years- it has been at least 15 since Ma Bell's children abandoned all rental phones in place, IIRC.
-- aem sends...
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aemeijers wrote:

I was guessing about the time period, all I remember is that it was in the 90's. A length of time soon to be 20 years. Hell, I remember the first grade from the 1950's, Sister Godzilla made quite an impression on me, I still have knots on my head from back then.
TDD
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If kids can figure out the rotary dial, at all.
--
Christopher A. Young
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wrote:

If I had a two-line phone, I'd feel obliged to get a second line. Does that make me obsessive compulsive? (I wouldn't get one, but I'd feel like I should)

I have a few, probably enough for the rest of my life.

I have one in the basement, at my workbench. A different phone, but I have the same shoulder bracket on it that my mother used in 1956. Some of the rubber has smudged, I'd call it, moved like modeling clay. It must have undergone some chemical or strong physical change to do that.

I don't have kids over, but a friend 15 years ago had one on the wall in the kitchen and she told me that her 12-year old kid's friends didn't know what it was.

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Wayne Boatwright wrote:

UPSes are cheap these days, and if you are in an area that is prone to long power outages, a small generator can quickly pay for itself by keeping the refrigerator going and preventing spoiled food.
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Pete C. wrote:

Too rich for my blood- I just have a real phone in every room, and keep a stack of the 'blue ice' things in the freezer. As long as it isn't over 100 degrees out, and I severely limit my refrig open-door time, I'm good for about 48 hours. If I think outage will be longer than that, I put the stuff that will actually go bad quickly in a small cooler, and put some of the blue ice in that. I can live with the bread, mustard, fizzy water, and veggies getting warm. I do wish I had a gas stove, though, like my last place had. And city water.
-- aem sends, a cheap SOB as usual...
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aemeijers wrote:

Mustard in the fridge?
How about ketchup?
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the big issue. living in freezing areas with power outage.
frozen pipes ruins everyones day
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I keep mustard and ketchup in the fridge. Also bread, but it tends to dry out but at least it doesn't get moldy.
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HeyBub wrote:

Anything not in a sealed metal, glass, or thick-wall plastic container lives in the fridge. (The better to not encourage small four-legged guests.) Other than some (rather old at this point) Mickey D's packets in the fridge box of leftover takeout condiments, I don't keep ketchup, since I don't care for it. I barely use mustard anymore, for that matter. Anyway, I hate the brown grunge on the outlet, and the separation of the oil, when you store it warm.
-- aem sends...
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wrote:

I keep mustard in the fridge, but then I am on the smae jar of mustard for 26 years now. I only keep it for company, and what little company I have has never asked for mustard.
When I got an aparment in college, I told my roommate the ketchup had to go in the fridge and he told me the can of hershey's syrup had to go in teh fridge. We each told the other, No it doesnt'.
So we ddidn't put either in and it was fine.
I think restaurants don't put ketchup or mustard in the fridge but I"M not sure.
Hershey's will get moldy if you leave it uncovered some of the time and wait maybe 3 weeks, but a) it rarely lasts that long, b) you can cut off the lid and spoon out the moldy part, which is only the very top millimeter or two, and the rest is fine and tastes the same. DAMHIKT, but I did it quite a few times.
Haller, if you're home you can turn the water on a tiny bit and the pipes won't freeze. If the whole house gets close to 32, I guess you have to turn on all the faucets, and yes that would be a problem for the clothes and dish washers.
BTW, it was explained here that hot water pipes freeze sooner than cold water pipes do. It was explained why.
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mm wrote:

(snip)
That is why I also mentioned that I wish I was on city water. I'm on a well- so no power, no shower, and you can flush each toilet once. That alone tempts me to get a small genset, and put the well pump on a pigtail, and rig a passthru to the back yard so I can run the generator out in the shed 50 feet away. But as seldom as extended outages happen around here, the hotel down the road is probably a more cost-effective solution.
-- aem sends...
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We had 11 days after an ice storm with no power. All our neighbors had power. A tree limb fell across the power line to our house. We closed the BR doors and used a kerosene heater and lived in the LR for that time. Three people close together was cabin fever. We had hot water from the gas water heater. And city water. Having a generator for the well sounds like a good idea.

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toilets break when the traps freeze, washewrs dryers and everything with liquids would freeze and break, let alone humans trying to live in such conditions
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Pete C. wrote:

But as usual the cheap ones are real junk. Had an interesting experience just last month. Someone of the big box is their friend mentality bought some cheap UPSs for equipment at a site. I received a call that various equipment powered down. The cheepo big box UPSs don't have an auto buck boost but instead draw energy from the battery. The local power company lost a large circuit breaker upstream so they had a brownout in the region. The voltage was only dropped to 109 VAC but that was enough for the toy UPSs to drop their load after a while. The real UPSs I had specified a few years earlier kept there loads up with no problem until the next day when the power company completed their repairs.
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wrote:

You have UPSes that will power something for a whole day? A computer, they power? Or something that uses as much currrent? I thought mine wity a new 4AH battery would only work for about 10 minutes.
I bought my first one at 80% off at staples and I liked it. When it broke I bought a famous brand, the leading brand, at a hamfest, but the power switch is not big enough to work with my toes like the other one was.
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mm wrote:

I think you may have missed the point. The battery part of the UPS wasn't needed because the boost did the job. That could go on indefinitely.
A computer,

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wrote:

Yes, thank you. I did miss the point, even though I read the part about boost.
Do you think my UPS would have boost? I have a Tripp-Lite UPS I bought used probably 8 or 10 years ago. It was surplus from some office, so I'm guessing it's 15 years old at least.
When I lived in NY during the big period of brownouts around the nation, late 70's or early 80's, I took some fairly big transformer, 5x5x4 inches, with a 12 volts output among others iirc and I think I connected the output in series with the input so that I could add the two together and get a boost. and when the voltage dropped 10 volts, I could get the full voltage to power my tv. It worked. I figured I wasn't defeating the purpose of the brownout, because I only ran the tv on the boost voltage, nothing else.
I barely used it and still have the thing. Do you think it would run my desk computer during a brown out?

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mm wrote:

Do you even HAVE brownouts?
Reducing voltage to cope with demand is not common in most parts of the country.
Actually, most parts of the country don't HAVE excessive demand or have made arrangements to handle the situation.
The more common conditions are reclosure time - that is the time the automatic switches take to re-route power when a truck takes out a pole - and sub-station faults. The first loses power to the customer for up to half a second, the second drops power for a few minutes.
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wrote:

Well, no, not yet. Not since the 70's.

We have a lot of those, but I doubt we have many trucks hitting poles.
Thanks.
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