Teflon Tape

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Tony wrote:

I use pipe dope that contains Teflon. *snicker*
TDD
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

Actually now that I look at it, my also contains teflon.
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Wrong. That's not what pipe dope is for.

Yes, that would be the problem -- combined with not understanding what pipe dope is for. Pipe dope is *not* a sealant to prevent leaks. It's a *lubricant* that makes it easier to tighten the joints enough that they won't leak. Pipe threads are tapered: the pipe needs to be threaded far enough into the fitting that the tapered threads expand the fitting slightly. *That* is what keeps the joint from leaking.

Same reason.

And now you know.
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Doug Miller wrote:

I use Leak Lock which is available at most HVAC and plumbing supply houses.
http://www.highsidechem.com/lklcksp.html
TDD
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snipped-for-privacy@blueballs.com wrote:

Never heard of it.
Never needed it, either.
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Doug Miller wrote:

The product has been around for many years and I use it on just about every connection I make regardless of what it is, except oxygen, I don't think it's rated for oxygen and it's not recommended for alcohols.
TDD
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snipped-for-privacy@blueballs.com wrote:

Wouldn't it be easier to just wrench things tight enough that they don't leak? Works for me...
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wrote:

So then if this is so, thread + pipe dope might be a good initially, but mebbe bad for the 10-20 year long haul? I've seen a lot of prof'l plumbers use the thread+dope -- plus, they sell balls of "plumber's thread"..
--
EA



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Doug Miller wrote:

What brand and product do you use?
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Doug Miller wrote:

Funny, mine says "lubricates and seals".
It's a *lubricant*

So why did mine break before making a seal? I tried both teflon and pipe dope. (not both at once)

And now I know what? To use hose clamps on threaded PVC fittings?
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Doug Miller wrote:

http://www.oatey.com/Channel/Shared/ProductGroupDetail/90/Great_White__Pipe_Joint_Compound_with_PTFE.html
"Lubricates and seals all threaded joints."
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Tony wrote:

"Thread tape is appropriate for use on tapered threads, where it is the thread itself that provides the seal surface... One of the defining characteristics of PTFE is how good it is at defeating friction. The use of PTFE tape in tapered pipe threads performs a lubricating function, which more easily allows the threads to be screwed together, to the point of deformation, which is what creates the majority, if not all, of the seal."
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HeyBub wrote:

Why is it that more wraps gives a better seal? I've sure found that to be true.
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HeyBub wrote:

Ahh! It does say ""the majority", if not all", so evidently sometimes the Teflon is making the seal!
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Tony wrote:

Or pipe dope. Or soldering. Or something else. Or it's not sealed at all.
Personally, I just lube up the joint with WD-40 and give it a go.
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Plumber's string -- or even sewing thread -- and pipe dope is THE leak guarowntee. Too bad it's such a messy pita. But indeed there have been more than few times when teflon tape didn't do it -- rarely a failure on copper, tho.
But, you really think WD40 is the equal of teflon tape? If so, then WD40 really DOES have a use!! This, and tapping aluminum....
--
EA
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Existential Angst wrote:

Well, it's a so-so lubricant and certainly handier than chicken fat. Until after lunch. My lunch sack usually sits in the truck lubricating itself until the whistle blows, so after that...
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HeyBub wrote:

It is referring to threads being screwed together with teflon, not soldered or with pipe dope or anything else.

Yummy! I love WD-40 in my morning oatmeal!
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Hey Bub-
What is the source of the posted quote?
What follows is a cite of a site .... :) that confirms my experience YMMV
The complete details of pipe threads (tapered threads) are somewhat nuanced...
some are meant to be used with sealant (dope or tape) NPT some are meant for "dry fit" NPTF
NPT vs NPTF
THREAD DESIGN The requirements for NPT (National Pipe Thread) are spelled out in ANSI B1.20.1 The requirements for NPTF (National Pipe Thread Fuel) are spelled out in ANSI B1.20.3
those interested in the details can take a look at .......
http://www.ring-plug-thread-gages.com/ti-NPT-vs-NPTF.htm
YEARS ago when I worked on the design & manufacturing of some hydraulically powered hardware (AH-64 AWS Ammunition Feed System) the Army required that no sealant or Teflon tape be used any pipe threads in all "deliverable" hydraulic systems.
We were required to use NPTF (dry seal) threads; all components & fittings. These threads were precisely machined and required precision gauges to assure that they would, in fact, mate and seal. They were a bitch to work with but they did "dry seal".
"Normal" pipe threads lack the precision to develop reliable sealing without the use of tape or dope....hence the use of sealants with pipe threads.
For years (my aerospace years), I used Teflon tape on non-deliverable hardware (shop systems, test rigs, lab equipment, etc)
I switched to dope for residential work based on the suggest (actually, chiding) of a master plumber.
For a while I used both tape & dope....now I'm back to tape alone (the thick Mil-Std stuff) or if I'm feeling nervous about thread quality...then it's BOTH.
Also for PVC to metal threaded connections........PVC into metal NEVER metal into PVC.
cheers Bob
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DD_BobK wrote:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thread_seal_tape
See also: http://crunchpedia.org/Thread_seal_tape
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