Swamp Cooler to Refrigeration A/C

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Take another bong hit, everytime the load call smaller and smaller until it worked. I think you even learned the term effectiveness on that one lol.
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How about a 105F db 65F wb ambient, 10,000 Btu/hr sensible gain. You can even confer with your ficticious friends down under. Pretty small load in a fairly dry place. Read up on wet bulb first.
Maintain 80F with an indooor evaporative cooler.
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In a standard AC system, only the compressor unit is outside the house, connected by 2 small pipes to the refrig coil unit, which is mounted inside the furnace's plenum, usually above the heat exchanger in an updraft furnace. It also uses the furnace's existing blower to circulate the refrig air.
No large ducts go outside, so it may be possible to replace the swamper with the compressor unit, depending on distance.
Other solutions could be as other poster mentioned.
--reed
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use
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Sounds to me like your not as far off from the goal as you think. If the swamper is outside on the ground and you intend to remove it then the duct work from the swamper to the first register in the home can be removed. Replace the furnace with a furnace and a "A" coil for the a/c. Duct work can be larger for swampers than the a/c. I have seen homes in Phoenix with 2 complete duct work systems so that the moist air does not bother the "A" coil. I usually install a damper above the "A" and you just have to remember to change positions for the system running.
Ask around and find someone who has done several of these conversions. Experience is the key. Then add some insulation in the attic.
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Thanks. I'll call around and see what they say. I really don't want to be tearing up the slab, walls, roof for this so we'll just see what's doable. I can't add insulation in the attic cause there isn't one :) (flat roofed house). I really just wanted to see if this was doable without major construction/costs. Sounds like "maybe" is the answer and my best bet is to get someone in here that knows what they're doing! Cheers, cc
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And of course in Phoenix, the humidity of the monsoon season will make you glad you've gone AC in July and August. If you don't have forced air heat with a return air system now, there are AC units that mount a somewhat attractive unit on the upper wall of a room and run two small refrigerant tubes outside to the condenser. I think Mitsubishi is one manufacturer. This was one possible solution for my Mother's house which has hot water heat and no ductwork of any kind. The other was what I think they called a high pressure system which had a series of small round vents installed along the outer edge of the ceiling and connected by flexible hose to one large duct that ran down the center of the attic. One large return would have been cut into the ceiling in a central hall area. Ended up purchasing a portable AC unit that connected to a window with flexible vent tube. She's 84 and can't be convinced that air conditioning isn't inherently bad for the health. She'll only turn it on once or twice per season.
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20 TA.6'max average temp, Phoenix in May (F) 30 WO=.0045'outdoor humidity ratio 40 TI'indoor temp setpoint (F) 50 PWI=EXP(17.863-9621/(460+TI))'wet surface vapor pressure ("Hg) 60 WI=.012'indoor humidity ratio setpoint 70 PAI).921/(1+.62198/WI)'indoor air vapor pressure ("Hg) 80 EVAPRATE=.1*(PWI-PAI)'evaporation rate (lb/h-ft^2) 90 EVAPAREA=2*2*4*40'evaporation area (ft^2) 100 P=EVAPRATE*EVAPAREA'indoor water evaporation rate (lb/h) 110 RV=P/(4.5*(WI-WO))'average outdoor ventilation rate (cfm) 120 FANCAP=2*RV'reversible fan capacity (cfm) 130 EFF=.9'air-air heat exchanger effectiveness 140 TV=TA-EFF*(TA-TI)'incoming fresh air temp (F) 150 CCAP00*P-1.08*(TV-TI)*RV'sensible cooling capacity (Btu/h) 160 PRINT P,FANCAP,TV,CCAP
water flow fan cap fresh air cooling (lb/h) (cfm) temp (F) (Btu/h)
30.78896 1824.531 81.36 29449.03
When indoor air rises to 80 F, we might evaporate 30.78 lb/h of water into slow-moving air from a 1'x2'x4' vertical water sculpture made from 40 2'x4' 4 mm Coroplast sheets with spacers (about $80, including some 3M 4693H glue) in a folded Coroplast tank with a float valve. Sandwich the sheets together with vertical corrugations and horizontal spacers and a plastic film manifold at the bottom, with water flowing out corrugations at the top and running down both sides. Initial film coverage might improve as mineral films build, until we clean it by pumping vinegar. Harbor Freight's $5 10 watt fountain pump can do 1 gpm with a 5' head.
When the indoor RH rises to 56%, we might run Lasko's $53 2155A 2470 cfm 90W reversible fan with a cycle timer in a wall that divides the house into 2 partitions to make a bidirectional "Shurcliff lung" air-air heat exchanger. A 40'x60'x8' tall house with 1600' of 6" walls has 800 ft^3 of stud cavities. If they contain 800 pounds of unfaced fiberglass insulation with a 144 Btu/F heat capacity and lots of surface and we move 1824 ft^3 of air with 29 Btu/F through it, the heat capacity ratio is 20%, so we might get 90% effectiveness.
And walls with inflowing air might gain less heat from the outdoors... http://www.cibse.org/pdfs/8cimbabi.pdf has an equation for the dynamic metric U-value of a breathing wall, as corrected:
Ud = VRhoaCa/(e^(VRhoaCaRs)-1) W/m^2K, where
V is the air velocity in meters per second, Rhoa is air density, 1.2 kg/m^3, Ca is the air's specific heat, 1000 J/(kg-K), and Rs is the wall's static thermal resistance in m^2-K/W.
Using V = 1/3600 (1 meter per HOUR :-), and Rs = 5.7 m^2K/W (a US R32 wall), Ud = 0.058 W/m^2, like a US R98 wall. A more typical V = 10 meters per hour makes Ud = 1.7x10^-8 W/m^2K, like a US wall with an R-value of 334 million :-)
Nick
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