supply side water shutoff question

This winter the furnace quit in a old house, nobody was living there at the time. Anyway the pipes froze and the main water shutoff valve was turned off so that when the heat came back on there would not be a flood. Problem is the supply side shutoff valve did not shut off and there was a lot of water damage.
My question is can these valves be repaired or must they be replaced. Second question, are the fittings standard, this is an old house so the valve has been there for more than 40 years. I assume it has a coupling joint of some type.
Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks in advance
--
real email is snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If the valve froze too it should be replaced as the body may have cracks in it. It may be possible to repair, but since I don't know what the problem with it is, what brand you have I can't say for sure. In either case, the supply has to be shut off at the street so spend a few bucks and put in a brand new ball valve and be safe.
I don't know what fittings you talk about as being "standard" but all tubing is and the fitting that go on them are the same size and have been for decades. Sounds like you need some pro help.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks Edwin,
The part that you said the fittings have been the same for decades tells me that I should be able to buy a valve at HD, a "ball valve" and when I go down there next week, (160 mile drive) I might have a chance of replacing it. Yes the water at the street has been turned off since Feb. The supply valve was not frozen, and when I turned the wheel it rotated just as though it were shutting off, but somehow the valve did not close off the water line and when the pipes thawed out the water flowed. I was not there at the time. It is my moms place and she's in a NH that's why there is nobody there. In any case thanks for your response, it is helpful to know those fittings are the same and should be for this house too. If I can't do this then I will have to seek out a pro.
Dennis
--
real email is snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

for next winter install a thermostat that turns on a lamp, flashing in window. ask neighbors to call if they see light flash.
allowing a home to freeze repeatedly can do long term damage, and definetely install ball valve, they are super reliable
vacant homes are at great risk of vandalism, espically arson.
might be a good idea to rent it out free or low cost to a realtive for security.
if ou tell homeowners home is vacant expect insurance to increase by 5.....
5 times cost.....
if you dont tell insurance and say fire occurs, they will investigate, and possibly not pay:(
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article

I was not aware of that and will check it out with insurance co. I will try to replace with a good quality ball valve, if I can get the old one off. The lamp idea was suggested by a neighbor who by the way is a retired insurance agent. We hope it won't be vacant for much longer, but we don't have a lot of control over that for reasons I can't explain here. It's in a very tiny town, village to be more specific.
Thanks for your good tips, they are appreciated.
Dennis
--
real email is snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.