Superglue versus super glue gel

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On Thu, 05 Feb 2015 18:53:14 -0500, Stormin Mormon

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On 2/5/2015 8:14 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Don't give me orders. Only future wife can do that.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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I would think the consideration would be the intended purpose rather than the cost. If the surfaces are smooth, why would one want the gel? One of the things I like about super glue is the way in wicks into tiny openings...gel wouldn't wick. Non-gel can work well on less than smooth surfaces too if you prepare the surface...
In conjunction with my photography, I sometimes had to make frames, generally largish ones (up to 40x60). I ordered the frame pieces from a stock house, they cut to size on a guillotine. Frame wood is generally quite soft and the cut edges wind up rough. My solution was to rub a stick of chalk over them, filling up the hollows; gently blow off excess, apply super glue and join. The glue wicks through the chalk binding it to itself and continues into the wood, binding the thin chalk layer to the wood. All my frames were joined this way, no nails, none ever failed.
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dadiOH
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On 2/5/2015 6:12 AM, dadiOH wrote:

That's totally creative. I would never have considered that. Wonder if that chalk and glue can be applied to other situations?
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Superglue and baking soda has been used by modelers for decades. The baking soda accelerates the polymerization of the glue and also acts as a filler in a less than optimal joint or can make a strengthening fillet. It particularly useful when gluing up a wing from balsa ribs.
To some extent it is a homemade gel glue. Typically if you're building a plane you get a big bottle of CA glue. The thin type as the most versatile as you can use it to laminated a fabric strengthener to the wing root joint and use it with the baking soda for joints that require more body.
I'm not Sally Safety, but when you're using a lot of the stuff like for the wing root lamination, believe the notes about adequate ventilation.
Before it became a household item we used the original Eastman formulation for gluing up o-rings out of round neopreme stock. I got my unsuspecting girl friend to glue her fingers together in the classic trick. She still married me, showing a distinct lack of judgement.
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On Thu, 05 Feb 2015 08:10:16 -0500, Stormin Mormon

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Back to the original question, the gel is very useful on vertical surfaces where the regular glue would just run down and stick to undesired surfaces.
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On 2/6/2015 3:26 PM, snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

First, I'm not sure that's permitted on Usenet.
But, thank you in any case.
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Christopher A. Young
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