Sump pit: fetid water

Hi,
I've recently installed a sump pit and pump in the basement of my little brick bungalow.
The holes in the sump basin were drilled about 12 " up from the bottom of the basin. This allowed me to put a garden hose in the basin to test the pump switch, etc.
Everything tests out. The sump system is functional. But there's 6-10" of water staying in the basin. It will become rancid/fetid.
The sump system is not needed very often. I am thinking of drilling a few holes in the bottom of the basin so it will drain during dry spells.
Can anyone think of reasons -not- to do this?
Thanks, Peetie
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Assuming your crock is sitting on a few inches of crushed stone, putting a hole or two in the bottom won't matter. It is more likely to get mud in the sump if there are holes in the bottom, but having stinky water in the sump is probably more of an issue.

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On Sun, 18 Jan 2004 15:57:58 -0500, "donald girod"

Yes, I neglected to mention that there is about 5-6 " of gravel under the basin.

Or at least it -could- become a headache. I'm guessing that the ground water level will be well below the sump pit about 57 days out of 60.
The pit is right beside the washing machine, which is right by the Clorox jug. I guess I'll wait/see if the water becomes fetid, if so, throw a little chlorine in and maybe then drill the holes in the bottom.
Thanks to all for your input.
Cheers, Puddin'

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Pudding snipped-for-privacy@mail.com (Puddin' Man) wrote:

The only time I've seen a ground water sump pit go fetid is when organic material (aka mouse or shrew) got in and drowned, and decayed.
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It's been our experience that it generally won't do that. Either there's sufficient water flow the pump kicks in and the circulation prevents the water going bad, or the pit dries out.

But where will it drain _to_?
I suppose if you have a plastic liner on the pit you may have problems during 'non pumping season', but if the "basin" is porous, you probably won't.
If I was in a situation where the pit stayed wet enough to go "bad" during the time of year the pump wasn't cycling, I'd be tempted to throw a couple teaspoons of bleach in.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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For 25 year my sump pit ALWAY had water in it. On dryer periods, there would still be some water there, maybe 6" or so. A few years back, the town installed a big anti-backup device in my sewer line. It is not supposed to take on any ground water, however, since that was installed, during dry periods, my sump pit now completely drys out. ..... strange! My best guess is that the anti-backup thing in the front lawn is taking up the ground water and pumping it into the city sewer ... clearly illegal. However, the town did it, so it's their problem. BTW, I did let them know about it and they didn't seem to care. Now, if we get a heavy rain after a dry spell, the pit usually won't fill up for several days after the rain.
Chris Lewis wrote:

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Or, the anti-backflow preventer is preventing the storm sewer backing up into your pit. Or, the water level isn't quite as high as it used to be.
Much of this depends on current water table right against your foundation, and the water level in the sump will usually equilibriate to that (especially if you have french drains).
There are times where our sump pit never fills up enough to trip the sump pump, but, if you manually trip it, you can see that more water flows in, and re-equibrilates to the same level after the pump shuts off.
Thus, for example, if you have french drains, having the pit dry out means that the water level has gone below the bottom of the pit.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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Chris Lewis wrote:

about 9' deep, might be changing the natural flow of the ground water. BTW, I have a monitor panel in the basement for the anti-backflow unit, and have only once seen it pumping. This was not a backup condition at the time, so one can assume that ground water seeped in and was being pumped out. Also, I have wanted to install an elapse time unit across the pump, but it is not a priority, so I've never done it.

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If it pumps regularly it wont become rancid. Dont drill a hole ,you are trying to remove water not add it. You could pour in a bag of concrete to the proper level.
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