Straightening twisted floor joists?

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It's not top to bottom where it's out an inch, what I'm looking at is if you sight down the straight joist opposite the bad one, how far is the bottom kicked out to the side - "/ " on the bad one compared to the good one.
I don't think this matters but I forgot to mention the place was a factory framed house that came as walls and trusses on a truck, then was put together on site. The place that built it - Harvest Homes - is still in business. I just wonder if the guy that put it together is ....
Thank you all for the help so far. It helps so much to just talk this out with knowledgeable folks. Carpentry isn't hubby's thing, though he's fine with plumbing and electrical, so the carpentry stuff usually ends up with me, even if it's just managing someone we hire to do it. I'm better with the saws than he is ;).
Liz
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Oh. That's better! "Movement" in the construction/engineering trades has a very specific meaning.
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Sorry for the confusion, I'm not familiar enough with the lingo. BTW, what's the correct term for my joist problem? I searched Google for about 2 weeks trying every keyword I could find - "twisted", "rolling over", "sliding", "angled" etc. and ended up posting here when I couldn't find anyone else having the same situation I am. I was wondering if I just wasn't searching on the right words.
Liz
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I would have tried all those words too. It's just too obscure an issue.
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BP wrote:

And an entirely different meaning in the medical trade. ;)
R
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LOL Rico..... D'jour. Very well done!
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On Thu, 17 Nov 2005 13:17:19 -0600, Duane Bozarth

Not to be a stickler for detail, but try 30 years,
From the orginal post:
"We live in a small cheap 3 bedroom ranch built in 1976."
DJ
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DJ wrote:

...
...
FO
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On Fri, 18 Nov 2005 09:10:23 -0600, Duane Bozarth

Ok, guess you didn't like that one, how about 29 years? I rounded up, you rounded down. OP indicates house built in 1976, I'm closer...
Neener, neener <G>
DJ
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DJ wrote:

...
What does 30 add over "20+" to the intent or content of the thread?
I didn't "round" I literalized w/o going back to look up what _specific_ year OP said as it wheter it was 20 or 30 years wasn't significant to the point I was making--that _a significant time_ had passed w/ not much sign of any real structural fault.
Other than the chance to put in a dig at someone, there was no point whatsoever in your posting afaict.
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On Fri, 18 Nov 2005 13:40:18 -0600, Duane Bozarth

Probably more than your "FO", at least mine was relevant to the thread.

Lighten up, I was agreeing with you and going on to say it had been even longer "w/ not much sign of any real structural fault." I happen to remember the date mentioned by the OP, probably because my home is also of that vintage.
DJ
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Yes, you can straighten the joists, but doing so may wall produce nailpops and cracking wallboard above, because the plywood subfloor is going to heave a little bit.
You build a big-ass wrench out of dimension lumber, bolts, and plywood, sort of like a peavy with a fixed tooth, and pry the joist vertical, and have someone stuff blocking in there while you hold it.
Where there's something in the way so you can't put in blocking, bridge across the bottom of the joists with a 2x4 until you cross two joists that ARE blocked, on each side.
(see www.goedjn.com/sketch/wrench.gif for the sketch of the prying tool).
After doing the whole floor, inspect the topside for things that have popped up.
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Well. I'm sure that if you want to you could leaver the joist straight, but if it was me, I'd use a clamp. go to the hardware store and buy a two pair of 3/4' pipe clamps, the type furniture makers use to clamp glue ups and buy 2 pieces of black iron pipe. buy the biggest heavest clamps you can find, don't go cheap. 1. select a joist bay where the opening is wider at the bottom than at the top. 2. measure the distance at the top of the bay and cut your 2x10 bridging to fit. 3. drive the bridging into the bay and nail at the top. 4. use the pipe clamps to pull the joist together at the bottom closing the gap and pulling the twisted joist straight. 5. nail in the bridging in place at the bottom 6. before removing the clamps repeat steps 2, 3 & 4 on either side of the bay you just repaired 7. remove the clamps and replace them to span the three bay and repeat step 5 & 6. 8. continue.
Jeff

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wrote:

That will work fine too, as long as you're sure you know which joist is going to move when you start clamping.
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On 16 Nov 2005 07:19:42 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

Just punch those guys and you will feel much better. They deserve it and we all know you really want to do it.... :) Heck, the sound waves generated by the punch might even twist them boards back where they belong.
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