Stall Shower vs Big Vanity

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House has 1 1/2 baths. The main one is small (11x5) and has a stall shower and separate tub. One way or another the bathroom is going to get redone. I wouldn't have a problem using the tub as a shower and using the space the stall shower takes up to put in a big sink/vanity like the Significant Other wants, but several friends say that a separate shower is a big convenience and selling point. Apparently many people won't consider buying a house without a stall shower.
I suppose the correct answer is to do whatever we want to do. Neither of us is quite near an age where climibing over a tub wall is a big challenge. Still, I was shocked at the number of people who told me that I'd be crazy to remove a stall shower.
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When our house was still in the planning stages, we noticed that the master bath had a tub and a shower and a two sink vanity.
The changes we made (easy when you are still dealing with paper) were to get rid of the tub first. There is one in the other bathroom and one is enough. Next change the vanity to a single sink. Our previous house had a two-sink vanity and in 16 years there we never used both sinks. One was always enough.
Charlie
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wrote:

No two-sink vanity. That certainly makes sense.
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dgk wrote:

Take out the stupid tub and leave the shower. The only thing even close to being as useless as a tub is a shower in one.
--

dadiOH
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wrote:

I think a tub comes in handy, particularly as we get older. Lying in hot water, does seem to make things better. Of course, I haven't done it in a year or two.
These rowhouses are really starter houses and folks often trade up and move further from the city. So having a tub is important for young families with young kids. That doesn't describe our situation though.
And, of course, nothing is forever. Whatever I do can be undone.
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re: Whatever I do can be undone...
...for a price.
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er: The only thing even close to being as useless as a tub is a shower in one.
IYHO, of course...
Both of my daughters - late teens - still enjoy a nice long bubble bath sometimes. Far be it from me to deny them this simple pleasure.
So if your tub get used, and all you have room for is a "shower in one" then "useless" doesn't fit either case.
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wrote:

I like baths. I watch tv while I soak.
Also good for washing children too big for a bathinette, and probably the smaller one's too. Try to get two people in a shower. And it's good for washing big things. Or storing a live fish until it's time to cook it.

Huh. It's easy to take a shower in a bathtub.
Also, when your furnace doesn't work, nothing else increases the humidity and feeling of warmth as does a shower into a stopped bath tub. Leave the bathroom door open and be sure to turn off the water before the bathtub overflows. Then let the water sit there until it cools off.
(Second best is boiling water on the stove.)
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Obviously you don't live in a very cold area, boiling water would do next to nothing if my furnace went out (increasing humidity is a bad idea if the house is cooling of in below freezing weather) --- I would stoke up the wood stove.
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On Thu, 17 Dec 2009 19:38:20 -0500, "EXT"

I meant, "Try to wash a baby or a child in a shower." :)

I'm sure you're right if it's going to get below freezing inside the house, but when is 40 or 30 or 20 out and it's going to go to 50 inside, or 40 or 35 inside, an increase in humidity I'll bet has as much effect anywhere as it does here.

If he takes out the bathtub, he could put a wood stove in that spot.
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snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.gov wrote:

I've always tought the ideal house would have...
1. tile or concrete floors
2. all rooms with a drain
3. furnishings built in on concrete or hung from the ceiling
Bring in a hose and hose the sucker down :)
--

dadiOH
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dadiOH wrote:

When I worked out in the Marshall Islands some years ago, we had housing units that were built in Australia. The units were like trailers with two rooms with separate outside doors and a bathroom in the middle with an interior door to each side. The floors were a hot welded seamed Vinyl material that curved up the side of the walls instead of a flat baseboard. This made it sort of a tub and very easy to hose out and clean. I thought how practical the Aussie designers are and how well they know construction workers who drink a lot and barf all over the floor. There's also that little tracking mud in the hut thing but I still believe it was for the barfing construction workers.
TDD
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wrote:

They are available now. They are called prisons.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Also known as "the big house".
TDD
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dgk wrote:

We have two bathrooms...guest bath has a tub/shower combo and the master has a wide vanity and a stall shower. We never use the tub, unless I'm cleaning something like venetian blinds :o) I would definitely want a stall shower if we moved, but it probably would not be a buying-point. Being without a tub might limit future sales, esp. to families with small children.
If you go with a stall shower and plan to stay in the home, be sure to allow for grab-bars, hand-held shower and some sort of seating - those things might become important when ya' get really old or if limited by an injury.
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dgk wrote:

In our house there is bathroom on every level including basement. All has separate shower stall with glass door and tiled walls. Main bath has Jacuzzi tub. Most of time we shower and at least on week end we soak in the tub. Also main bath vanity has two sinks, enough room for wife doing make up with big wall mirror. If one thing I want, I'd install multi head steam shower. Having separate shower is very handy. Also we have sauna in the enclosed 4 season sun room which we use a lot all season.
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You and Al Gore are real serious power users, right?
Joe
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dgk wrote:

I'd seriously look at the house floorplan and see if it would be possible to add a nice master bath, potentially with a small addition. Depending on the details, adding such a new bath may not cost much more than remodeling (replacing) an existing one.
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wrote:

Rowhouse, 18' by 40' or so. My neighbors are very nice but might object to me moving into their bathroom.
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