Splitting Internet & TV cable

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I have cable light. In other words, the slowest of internet services you can get.
Several people told me years ago, I should be able to split it off to my TV's. Now, about 4 yrs later, I finally gave it a try, taking a TV downstairs & hooked it up to my internet cable. It works!
Reading about using a splitter, I get that if you split the line in two, you lose half your signal strength.
My question is: Say if the TV isn't on, and I'm using the internet. Do I still only get 1/2 the signal strength?
Any advice on how to hook up to 2 TV's plus my modem for internet would be appreciated.
Oh yeah, my cable company says it's not possible to hook up to the TV on the light services unless I pay additional. But, I know a TV will work, just don't know if I can hook up both!
Many thanks!
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On 10/12/2010 9:45 PM, Crabby Pops wrote:

Sounds like the installer got lazy and left out the notch filter on the drop. Run ONE 2-way splitter upstream from the cable modem, and then split out the TV leg for the TVs. Expect it to stop working at some point. Without a cable box, you will only be able to get whatever analog channels your cable system still carries. Most have cutovers to all-digital in the works. Odds are the basic tier has nothing you can't get with rabbit ears or roof antenna, other than maybe a radar feed and the local public access channel.
BTW, that is NOT the cheapest internet service- dial-up is. In most areas, entry level DSL from Ma Bell is cheaper than cable, if you can get it in your part of town.
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It wasn't the installer, I'm not paying for cable TV. It's TW, and only costs me $19.95 a month. Used to pay $49.95, but they offered this light service.
I have rabbit ears, but can't get but a handful of channels. When I hooked up the cable to the TV, I must get about 30 channels, most of which I've never heard about.
Can't get DSL, and this is much faster than the dial up I had at $14.95 a month. Plus, it doesn't tie up my phone line.
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On 10/13/2010 7:04 PM, Crabby Pops wrote:

(snip)
You do understand they don't have a separate wire for the internet-only customers, right? When they hook up an internet-only customer, on an old-style cable system at least, they can install a filter (looks like a little silver can) on the drop for your house, to completely block the TV band, but still let the internet digital signal pass through. Apparently they don't bother any more, in your area. Same way they used to keep every TV subscriber from getting HBO and such.

Like I said, enjoy the freebie while it lasts. When and if your local cable TV goes all-digital, those free channels will vanish. Without the 'box' you get nothing.

--
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On Wed, 13 Oct 2010 19:58:18 -0400, aemeijers wrote:
[snip]

Those channels may be available on digital, and not encrypted. Most newer TVs can tune them. However, you won't get a guide. You'll have to look around and figure out what is what. Cable co. may change it at any time.
[snip]
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re: "However, you won't get a guide."
My parents have what you might consider *worse* than no guide. The have Comcast basic cable (no box) and they have that one channel with a scrolling grid as the guide. Not only do you have sit there and wait until the channel/show you are looking for comes scrolling around, you can't even watch another channel at the same time. I don't know which channels are which on their system so I used to have to sit there (in pain) trying to find ESPN or whatever. It was brutal!
I finally printed out all of their channels from the internet so at least I can find the channels, even if I can't find out what show is on when.
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On 10/16/2010 10:37 PM, Mark Lloyd wrote:

Uh, don't bet on it. Unless the TV has a slot for the card from the cable company (which amounts to a box), TV likely won't even see them as valid channels. OTA digital is not the same as cable digital. Even for non-encrypted channels, cable compresses the crap out of their signals. I'm pretty sure that applies to SD feeds as well as HD.
Should there have been a standard so all these delivery methods and hardware could play nice together? Yes. Is there one? Not that I've ever seen or heard or read about.
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wrote:

What service provider?

Okay, but TV transmission is different than packets in the IP protocol.

Dedicate one cable line for your modem/router. The cable company can solve this at the line entry/demarcation box on the side of you home.

Don't mix it up. The company can provision the lines and check signal strength.

Give one line dedicated for the Internet IP protocol. Watch TV in another room.

What service company?

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On 10/12/2010 10:27 PM, Oren wrote:

Uh, he doesn't wanna TELL the company- he wants free TV. On a sloppily run cable system, where they don't supress the TV signal on the drop for internet-only customers, it can sometimes be possible, at least for ananlog channels.
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wrote:

With a GOOD splitter, you generally get a 3.5db line and 2 7db lines. Use the 3.5 for your data. You will lose the signal strength even if nothing is connected to the second and third outputs.
I'm on Rogers (in Canada) and they set me up with 2 3way splitters. The first splits off to the modem on the 3.5Dzb line, and to the digital box from the first 7db line - the second 3 way connects to the second 7db line and splits off to the other TVs in the house and to the TV tuner on my PC.
Works great.
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Not necessarily. At my first splitter I have a output for internet and one for tv's. The tv run is then split multiple times for each room. However at the input to the cable modem I added a splitter for an adjacent tv. Works fine. I ran many internet speed tests with and without the splitter and there is no difference in internet speed or service. However YMMV depending on cable signal strength.
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wrote:

Not necessarily. At my first splitter I have a output for internet and one for tv's. The tv run is then split multiple times for each room. However at the input to the cable modem I added a splitter for an adjacent tv. Works fine. I ran many internet speed tests with and without the splitter and there is no difference in internet speed or service. However YMMV depending on cable signal strength.
================================================================== Do you have any sort of box? I'm not familiar with this new fangled stuff!
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You apparently verified that you can receive the basic TV channels off the cable line entering your house that is connected to your cable modem by hooking up a TV. There is no "box" involved. All you need are a splitter or splitters connected as I indicated in my previous post. You usually want a 2 way after the cable enters the house to seperate for TVs and cable. Then, if necessary to split it more, you split the TV one again as needed. You can also usually split the cable side again, but only if it's necessary. Go to RadioShack and tell them what you want to do and they will have the splitters and cable.
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wrote:

You apparently verified that you can receive the basic TV channels off the cable line entering your house that is connected to your cable modem by hooking up a TV. There is no "box" involved. All you need are a splitter or splitters connected as I indicated in my previous post. You usually want a 2 way after the cable enters the house to seperate for TVs and cable. Then, if necessary to split it more, you split the TV one again as needed. You can also usually split the cable side again, but only if it's necessary. Go to RadioShack and tell them what you want to do and they will have the splitters and cable. ======================================================================= Ok, thanks for the information!
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On Wed, 13 Oct 2010 16:55:26 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I would refrain from RadShack splitters, connectors and cables. It may work for the OP, but my cable company removed them and put in new at no cost.
Just sayin'.
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I'd agree. Find a real electronics store and get decent splitters and cable - as well as someone who might actually be able to spell "electronics".
If you think most of the staff at the home centers know less than you do, you should try to get advice from someone at a Radio Shack.
It usually takes me a couple of days to feel good about myself again after I get lazy and go to a Radio Shack instead of driving downtown to the *real* electronics store.
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I don't know what you mean by "real electronics store". In many places, like here in NJ, all you have today are stores like Radio Shack, Best Buy, PC Richard, or some other regional retailers which sell not only electronics, but stuff like appliances, air conditioners, etc. I guess you could go to a high end audio/video store for a splitter, but somehow I doubt they are going to have splitters that are superior to those at Radio Shack or that it's going to make a difference in hooking up a cable modem and TV. More likely, it's the same stuff made in China, marked up 3X over what it costs at Radio Shack.
I can't recall having a problem with splitters or COAX not working and I've bought them from a variety of places like Radio Shack, HD, Walmart, etc. There are probably a hundred million of these settups done by the average Joe just buying the stuff at any local store.
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On Thu, 14 Oct 2010 06:27:33 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

All I know is I bought the best splitters I could buy at The Source (formerly Shack in Canada) and I had issues with both my digital TV and my internet. I called in the cable company, they said throw that $HIT as far as you can throw it - replaced the splitters with theirs, and everything has worked perfectly since.
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On Thu, 14 Oct 2010 15:11:41 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

One would think that a passive device like a splitter is a non-issue.
I removed a 3-Way (made in Viet Nam) 5-1000MHz and replaced it with a RadShack 4-Way (made in China) 40-2150MHz splitter.
The cable company replaced the last splitter with theirs and I'm happy ever since. I guess the new stuff needs more MHz? <G>
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On Thu, 14 Oct 2010 06:27:33 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

http://www.kiesub.com/prostores/servlet/StoreFront
"Kiesub is a privately held corporation established in 1973, and the largest stocking electronic distributor in the state of Nevada."
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