Spa Wiring Project

Here is what I have: I have a brand new Sq.D 200 amp Homeline panel installed in my garage. I have an available 50 amp breaker.
What I plan to do is run 1" UV-resistant 41UM Rigid PVC along the foundation above grade for a distance of 50 feet to a Sq. D. Spa Panel using four strands of #6. Anyone with a license see any problems with my conduit or wire sizing???? I plan to have a separate 5/8" copper ground rod just for the spa.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Silencer wrote:

I guess I can't answer your question because I don't have a license.
Does the spa actually need a neutral wire? (maybe for a light or a convenience outlet)
You never said how many amps the spa draws, which is important for figuring the voltage drop.
Best regards, Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It appears to me the spa needs four wires. The unit draws 40 amps.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You haven't provided enough information for anyone, licensed or not, to answer that question.
Specifically, it's necessary to know the wire type (THHN, THW, RHW, etc) and the amperage required by the spa, before you can determine if #6 wire in a 1" conduit is appropriate.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
No license either, but a couple of things I know, after installing mine. The breaker must be at least 5 feet away from the spa, and within sight of the spa. So if you can see the 200 amp panel from the spa, you shouldn't need a separate box for the install, right? The breaker must be a GFI-type. Your wire gauge seems good to go. Your conduit must be anchored, what, every 8 feet? Could be less... Again- I am NOT licensed! Tom
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I used a two pole 50A GFI breaker. Mine needed 4 wire as the heater/pumps ran on 240V but the light and control panel ran on 120

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I hope you meant an "ADDITIONAL" ground rod.
You spa ground must still be connected (bonded?) to the main service ground.
The purpose of an "additional" ground is to provide a return path to ground for some "stray" voltages. It helps ensure that there is no significant voltage difference between, say, your grill and the frame of the spa.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Coupla points in adddition to what has already been said. I maybe wrong (always a distinct possibility) but isn't UM41 water pipe? You should be using schedule 80 conduit.
At least in the AZ sun, pvc conduit is going to look like a snake after a while. I would (and did) consider burying it. The underground part could be schedule 40 then.
If you're using THHN, the usual Home Depot stuff, then 6 AWG should do it even when derated for temperature, assuming that your spa is like mine, rated as a 40A load.
Conduit big enough to meet the code for the number and size of conductors and conduit big enough to actully pull the wire through are two different things especially if you have any bends.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Anyone that can afford to purchase and pay the electric to operate a spa is wealthy. Use some of your wealth to hire a licensed electrician. Feel free to run the pvc conduit yourself.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 27 May 2005 15:12:14 -0500, jsaefajhf@________.com wrote:

Oh, please. The purchase of a spa is one thing, but running the electricity for the new ones really costs very little, maybe $10 a month, certainly less than your high-speed Internet connection. Your suggestion to hire the electrician should be based on safety considerations, not your unfounded assumptions about someone else's affluence.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 27 May 2005 15:12:14 -0500, jsaefajhf@________.com wrote:

Well. I just installed mine so I have no bill yet to compare to. That said, while I haven't had the heater turned on for several days, I have it set to maintain 99F. It's currently at 101F, so if I work it right I guess I can put juice back into the line and lower my bill.
Having an outside temperature that hit 109 on Sunday probably doesn't hurt, until I turn on the A/C and then the spa heater goes into the noise.
Since it just started to sprinkle about 10 minutes ago in Tucson and the humidity is going up I guess turning off the evaporative cooling and turning on the A/C is going to happen momentarily.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.