Sound proofing a room

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In addition to the bedroom I will be remodeling that I mentioned in another thread, I am also going to remodel another room to use as a small recording studio.
What's the best process and materials to sound proof the room? Any good web sites out there that explains how to do it?
I will also post on a couple of the recording newsgroups too.
Thanks, David
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I don't know the first thing about it, but on most pictures of recording studios I have seen, there appears to be a gray foam rubber on the walls that looks like egg crate.
Start Googling, and I bet you have a good idea in less than ten minutes. Then get your input from the other newsgroups and pick yer pony.
Steve
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This is an anechoic chamber, best for single human voices but terrible for music and audibly poor for theatre etc. The OP's need is more probably to exclude noises from outside the room. This might be done by thick interior curtains.
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Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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Spray foam insulation to stop all air exchange, air movement carries noise.
theres special drywall that doesnt conduct sound..... and special acoustic tiles too.
there are pros that design such rooms.
care should be taken some foam is highly flammable
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Thanks for the tip on some of the foam being highly flammable.
I will check into different types of drywall and insulation.
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On Thu, 1 Oct 2009 18:33:28 -0700 (PDT), Shy Picker

100 people were killed in a matter of minutes at the Station Night Club in Rhode Island a few years ago when acoustic foam that was not rated fireproof, caught fire and burned VERY QUICKLY and emitted toxic fumes. (google for details) The safe stuff is more expensive.
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yeah that fire was terrible componded by locked fire doors so people coudnt leak in without paying
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That was open cell polyurethane foam panels (like Soundex and Audex), it flash burns like cellulose. Best solution is upholstered rigid fiberglass, which has much better acoustical properties anyway, and you can make panels yourself.
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wrote:

Not true. There were at least 4 useble exits. The problems were: 1) Initially everyone thought the fire was part of the show. 2)The fire completed engulfed the palce in a matter of 4 or 5 minutes. 3)Most of the crowd, even those near other exits all stampeded to the front door where they had entered. That quickly resulted in a doorway filled with panicked people stacked up and wedged in the doorway.
There was a crew there, filming a documentary about nightclub safety (!) of all things. They have photos of the front entrance with all the bodies, dead and alive, wedged there.
The people farthest from the front door, and near the stage when the fire started were within 10 feet of an unlocked fire exit that was ignored by most of them, including some of the band.
lesson learned: Whenever you are in a crowded public space, make sure you immediately figure out where the closest emergency exit is located. Finding it in the middle of chaos and darkness may be impossible.
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On Oct 2, 9:14am, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

I used to have Soundex and Audex foam panels in my studio, I ripped it all out after that fire, now I have all rigid fiberglass upholstered with nice some fabrics my wife selected. They look a hell of a lot better than urethane acoustical foam too. The fabric was applied with 3M #90 spray glue then I ironed it flat while the glue was still wet under the fabric. This permanently bonded the fabric to the fiberglass very tight and flat. Washing the fabric in a highly concentrated mixture of 20 Mule Team Borax (no rinse) also makes the fabric itself fire-retardant.
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Probably had knob and tube wiring inside the foam. ROTFLMMFAO!!!!!!!!!!!
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On Fri, 02 Oct 2009 18:11:12 -0500, Steve Barker

Not terribly funny to the friends, family and parents of those who died so horribly.
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

They're not likely on this group.
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On Fri, 02 Oct 2009 18:25:36 -0500, Steve Barker

I'm one of them
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Yes. Since I need to replace the drywall, I was only thinking about soundproofing the room from outside noises for now. I can address any acoustic problems within the room as needed.
Thanks, David
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There are many good web sites, and you can search the newsgroup's archives for many threads on the topic.
In a nutshell, sound travels by different mechanisms and the best method(s) for your particular situation will depend on the noise source, the current construction and location, and where you are trying to reduce the sound level.
R
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Build a isolated dual wall system using 2x4 studs on 2x6 top and bottom plates, frame the "outside wall" oc 16 inches like normal, frame the "inside wall" oc 16 inches but offset the first stud by 8 inches. Drywall out and in with 5/8 drywall, some add another layer of drywall in the middle cavity fastened to the backside of the "outside" wall. This is the only reasonable way to isolate a room. Mass and/or mechanical isolation stops sound (not foam). Foam is used to treat reflections and absorb bass modes within the room. As for the "gray egg crates" mentioned in another post, real egg cartons are a fallicy seen in movies, they do nothing and are a BIG fire hazard, wont pass inspection. Open cell polyurethane foam is also a HUGE fire hazard, actually worse than egg cartons. The only class A fire rated material excellent for internal reflection control and for controling bass modes and boominess is rigid fiberglass panels (google Manville rigid fiberglass, whispertone, etc). Buy the rigid fierglass, cut panels, and upholster the panels in your favorite decorator fabric with a hot iron and spray glue, then hang them strategically based on SPL measurements taken with a tone sweep generator and real time room analyzer till you get flat frequency responce in the room. Another thing to consider is the heating duct work to the room if you have forced air heat (and AC). This will be the biggest nuisance, a heating contractor can flare the ducts to be quieter and isolate the furnace vibration from transmitting into the duct work. Also google "resilient strips" for hanging the ceiling drywall if you want to soundfroof the ceiling from the joists, again isolation is solving the problem (not foam or insulation). Google how to build the dual wall system I described above, it works great and only adds 2 inches to a wall thickness. You could put insulation in the walls but it will have little effect, however isolation and/or mass works best, so a dual wall with 5/8 or 3/4 inch drywall gets you more bang for the buck than insulation, a third layer of drywall in the cavity will make it super quiet.
I have a home recording studio too.
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Wow, there is some good information there. I will have to see just how much of that I can or need to do in this small room.
Thanks, David
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In article

How dare you post an informative answer to a question in this newsgroup. You should be stood up against a soundproof wall and shot.
Hey, how about that health care reform, huh?
-Frank
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I built a home studion in my previous house.
What you want to do is isolate the room from the house. In effect, a room inside a room. To simulate this, I used resilient channels to hang a second layer of drywall offset from the first layer of drywall.
Used acoustic tile above with insulation batting above the tiles.
Last but not least, get a solid door - not a normal hollow slab door.
Larry
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