soo-soft water softener??? Does it work???

Ok, I have come to the decision that I need a water softener on my home. It is an older home and I don't have much space. I even went to a point of contact water heater to save space. I also do not like the idea of maintenance on the conventional water softeners. Has any one tried this type or know anythig about it. It uses no salt and easy to hook up. Apparenty works off electrical current to break up the calcium carbonate into smaller molecules that dont have the problems as normal hard water. Any thoughts?
http://www.soo-soft.com/./3tdhow_it_works.html
Just as an opera singer can break glass with her voice, the Soo-Soft water softener converts the hard calcium in the water. It does this through the use of a computer that creates multiple groups of high frequencies, which are driven into the coil that is wrapped around the incoming water pipe for the home. Although these frequencies are beyond the range of our ability to hear them, they continually break down the calcium into smaller and smaller particles until it reaches a consistency so fine that the water becomes silky-soft.
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snipped-for-privacy@myfwc.com wrote:

1. Molecules of a particular thing are all the same size.
2. If your water is so hard that the calcium carbonate precipitates and crystalizes (as claimed by the site) into "argonite" (it's aragonite) then you don't have water, you have sludge. Drill another well.
3. The site says that normal softeners replace calcium with salt. They don't.
3. The site is full of hooey. If it works as well as their site is accurate I'd avoid it like the plague. ____________

Too bad they didn't claim those high frequencies didn't drive away rats & roaches too...they'd have a double threat product :)
--

dadiOH
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In order to soften water you need to remove the minerals in the water. There are resin inside the softer that will "filter" out the minerals in the water. Salt or potassium are used to clean the resin periodically so the resin can filter again. This is the short explaination.
I am currently using Ecowater with potassium: http://www.ecowater.com
But there are a lot of makes and model operating with the same principle. I like the Ecowater ones because it's relatively small.
[AdvanceAgent #367924] Game I am currently playing: http://uc.gamestotal.com/?in67924
snipped-for-privacy@myfwc.com wrote:

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AdvanceAgent wrote:

A softener only uses the sodium or potassium of the sodium chloride or potassium chloride, softener salt or salt substitute.
All softeners use/have sodium form resin or man made Zeolite, so potassium is not as efficient and in many cases you will have to set the salt dose higher than if you were using softener salt. The incease can be as high as 30% more., while potassium always costs 1-2 times more than salt for the same size bag.
As to the physical water treatment anti scale or descaling devices.... they don't soften water, they are supposed to prevent or reduce scaling caused by water hardness. And the vast majority don't work in residential applications. And those few that do leave a white powdey film on all surfaces the water is allowed to evaporate on.
Gary Quality Water Associates
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Gary Slusser wrote:

Lets be perfectly clear about this. Water softeners work by replacing calcium, magnesium and other metals in carbonate groups with either sodium or potassium.They do not remove minerals from water. The only processes that I know about that we can do as consumers to REMOVE minerals are either Distillation,or Reverse Osmosis.
The amount of sodium (or potassium) added to water is trivial. Drinking 64oz a day of this stuff, 7 days a week will add less Sodium to your diet in a month than eating ONE of ANY fast food joint's quarter pound hamburger with cheese
And ecowater's softeners do not appear to be necessarily any smaller in physical size than any other unit.

The limiting item on size is how much resin is in the unit Amount of resin determines how much water it can treat between backwashes of the resin bed. Everyone uses the same resin suppliers,there are NO magic bullets out there .

This qualifies as a magic bullet. How in the world does a high intensity magnet affect non-ferrous minerals in water???Ok, if the magnetic intensity is HIGH enough,some effects can be noticed. But the question is,do most devices sold into the residential market achieve the required magnetic field intensity. I agree with Gary, this is hocus pocus for homes.
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I don't care about the dietary aspect, but I have a question. At a friend's house, the water at the 2nd floor faucet has a definite salty taste that's NOT present at the 1st floor faucets. All pipes are copper - relatively new house. Why would this be?
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

Water softeners treat the ENTIRE water supply of the house. They are installed at a point shortly after the cold water line enters the house. Sodium Carbonate, the mineral present in water after passing thru a water softener. Look it up on wikipedia, sodium carbonate has a cooling alkaline taste, no HINT of saltiness.
The salty taste in second story faucets is a plumbing problem for the second story. Someone messed up the plumbing to the second story. Only God knows what this is now, They need to talk to a plumber and get the plumber to check it out to see what is wrong.
Water softeners do not introduce Sodium Chloride (ala Salt) to the water.
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Sounds right. The guy who installed the upstairs plumbing was an idiot. In the tub, the faucet's on one end and the overflow drain is on the other. No way to get comfortable. Useless, in other words.
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

The kitchen faucet cold water might be plumbed with hard water. (My house is like that.) The first floor bathrooms might also be plumbed with hard cold water to the sink and/or toilet. The upstairs surely has only softened water running to it because they wouldn't run a third pipe up there for the hard water.
Water softeners replace each calcium or magnesium ion with 2 ions of sodium -- but it's not as much as you would think because there's not much calcium and magnesium in the water.
Bob
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zxcvbob wrote:

Take it from someone who has LIVED with a water softener in place for over 20 years.
WATER SOFTENERS DO NOT MAKE WATER SALTY TO THE TASTE!!!!!
And it could be just the other way around. Second story branches off BEFORE the water softener, and no one thought to warn/tell the homeowner. Second story hard, unconditioned water, mineral taste to it, vaguely salty, but more mineral tasting than salt. Ground floor, nice tasting water as it comes off of the softener.
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My thoughts? I can save you 25% on this and you will still get the same benefis. Find out how much it costs to have up and running. Go the the bank, withdraw 75% of that amount. Flush it down the toilet, or in winter, burn it for heat and save even more.
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