Soldering copper pipe connected to PEX

I am installing a humidifier in my house, and I need to tap into the water line. My builder used PEX plumbing and, of course, I don't have any of the crimping tools necessary for working on PEX. But, there is a length 3/4" copper pipe that goes between my water heater intake and the main PEX water line above. The total length of this copper is only about 2 or 3 feet. I would like to solder in a tap for the humidfier connection into this copper section, but I am concerned about the PEX that this pipe is connected to. Does anyone know how far I have to be away from the PEX connection before I can safely sweat a fitting into the copper pipe? If I just wrap a wet towel near the PEX connection (between the crimp and the joint to be soldered), will this be an adequate heat sink to avoid damage to it?
Thanks in advance for any advice.
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try checking local plumbing supply or home depot, they probably rent the PEX tool:)
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replying to hallerb, Ron wrote:

I know a tobacco chewing plumber friend who once told me he'd never use anything but copper. Well he's changed his mind. The tools needed aren't that costly, about the same as a good torch & pipe cutters. Anyway, thanks for the info that I picked up. Soldering next to pex pipe doesn't look like a wise thing to do.........just hate copper compression fittings though.
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On 3/14/2015 1:44 PM, Ron wrote:

How close to the PEX? You can melt it at 230F or more, but you won't start a fire with it.
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On Sat, 14 Mar 2015 17:44:02 +0000, Ron

That's what SharkBites are for - - -
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D Duddles wrote:

Yes. If you're 12" away and use a wet towel you have nothing to worry about.
R
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Is there some reason that you can't use a saddle valve?

the
water
copper
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towel
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Bob wrote:

Some codes prohibit them.
R
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Didn't know that, but I believe you, because some codes are real stupid. If it isn't getting inspected, I'd do it anyway.

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I'd guess you are OK but if you want to be sure, wrap a couple of wet rag around the copper away from where you will solder. That will make a heat sink.
I'd look at using compression fittings made for pex tubing. My local hardware store carries them.
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Can't you unscrew the PEX from the copper? You've got to get the water out of the copper before you cut it/solder it.
D Duddles wrote:

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This is all you need. http://www.cashacme.com/sharkbite.html

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wrote:

I am going to ask YOU a question. I just saw that PEX being installed on one of the TV home improvement shows. I can see that the tools are probably costly. But my question is this. Is that stuff solidly installable. In other words, does it sag between hangers? Can it be used on HOT water? Is there any advantage over PVC pipe?
Personally, I was not highly impressed with what I saw. The stuff looks flimsy, probably has a relatively short life expectancy, and seems easy to damage. Not to mention the need for special tools. It also appears that the fittings can not be taken apart. Just curious....
Personally I will only use metallic pipe as in copper, or galv. steel. I dont care for house floods, and expect my plumbing to last at least 30 years. I have never been impressed with PVC for water supply either (it's great for drainage and sewer). But the PEX looks even less durable than PVC.
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It is really kind of stiff although it can be bent eaier than soft copper tubing.
Can it be used on HOT water?
Yes, it is good to 180 degrees. I have a section in my baseboard heat as I've had a problem wiht copper in a certain place twice.

Easier to install, less fittings as it come son long coils and can be run around gentle bend and through walls with no spicing or fittings every 10 feet.

Not as flimsy as you think. Life span is over 100 years and not all that readily damaged. You can puncture copper tubing with a nail just as easily. It will take a bit of freezing and not split, an advantage over copper. Why not handle a piece of it before you decide how strong or weak it may be? http://www.pmengineer.com/CDA/ArticleInformation/features/BNP__Features__Item/0,2732,62120,00.html Wirsbo PEX is durable, corrosion resistant and has a life expectancy of over 100 years.

You can use compression fittings. You can easily splice into it. Right now, the tools are expensive for the homeowner that may want to make a cut in a line every five years, but then, compression fitting solve that. Tools will become cheaper in the future just like everything else.

You are basing your assessment on what???? Time to open your mind and let some new information in. I expect my plumbing to last much more than 30 years too. I'd definitely use pex in my next house
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Like you, I'm also an old fart .
However, you need to get with the program.
Google up Wirsbo and check out their "WRITTEN" 25 year warranty on AquaPex. Ever try and get a copper pipe or fitting mfg., to cover a defective piece? Forget about it.
If you are indeed an old fart, 25 years is long enough. If the special tool "an expander" is too pricey at about $125.00, consider using another new fitting called a Shark Bite from Cash Acme.
Those two items alone will make your life a lot easier, I know they have mine.
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Well, (1) it took 30 years for the copper tubes in my concrete slab to rot out. (2) Will AquaPex be around in 25.1 years? (3) will they have assets so you can sue?
FWIW, I went through this decision in 2001 and came up with "Use Copper" and chop slots in the slab to get passed doors.
And, check national, state and local building codes to see if PEX is permitted for fresh water. If you're doing heating lines, you will also want to do fresh water at the same time.
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Pex is probably the best for that application. You won't have to be doing it over in 30 years. Who did you sue for your copper replacement? Were they willing to pay? Why would you replace copper with copper knowing it will corrode again in 30 years, maybe less?

Yes, it is permitted.
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PEX has been used in England for over thirty years with no problems. Most people who have never heard of it confuse it with the black tubing used about 15 years ago that gave so much problems.
I saw a test done with PEX that convinced me. This person took a 12 inch piece and filled it up with water and then clamped off both ends with the closed pex fittings. Then it was frozen. The PEX didn't bust at all. Then it was allowed to thaw out and put under a propane torch until it was scorced a bit. Still didn't leak. Then this piece was opened and put in line under pressure of 100 PSI. Still didn't leak or budge. I've seen copper develop pinhole leaks in the worst place but this PEX is still going fine. Perhaps you too would need to see these tests to believe it.
J
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