Slightly OT Tire Pressure

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The sensors are usually made in to the valve stem. Just a much larger buldge inside the tire with its own battery. After a number of years the battery runs out and you have to replace the module at about $ 60 each or more. They work by sending a radio signal back to the car. Around 315 MHz I think.
Not sure when they were required ,but if you get a car that was sold new in the US in about the last 10 years it will have it.
My 2007 and 2008 both have the light on as each has one that is bad. As the state does not require them towork for the safety inspection, I am not going to replace them. That would be around $ 500 when all 8 go out. Which will probalby be before I get rid of them as they only have 25 and 55 thousand on them.
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On Wednesday, January 6, 2016 at 11:14:44 AM UTC-5, Ralph Mowery wrote:

"About" may be the operative word in your statement. However, it's not only a year issue, but also a make, model and trim level issue.
My 06 and 07 Honda's do not have TPMS.
I have an 06 Odyssey EX-L. The 06 Odyssey only had TPMS on the highest trim level, the Touring. In fact, that trim came with a special Michelin PAX run-flat tire, the only choice of tire and wheel that you could get. So many people hated them (or actually hated the cost to replace them once worn) that there are threads in Honda forums explaining the procedure to "De-PAX" the Odyssey by using Acura wheels and TPMS sensors.
As far as my (daughter's) 07 Civic, TPMS wasn't available on any Civic trim level in 2007.
It looks like 2008 was when Honda began using TPMS on all trim levels for the Civic and Odyssey.
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Here is the government rule on the TPMS. While not 10 years ago, not too far from it. Compliance Date:? Consistent with the phase-in commencing October 5, 2005, all new light vehicles must be equipped with a TPMS that meets the requirements of the standard by September 1, 2007, with the following exceptions. Vehicle manufacturers need not meet the standard?s requirements for the TPMS malfunction indicator and related owner?s manual language until September 1, 2007 (i.e., at the end of the phase-in), and vehicles produced by final-stage manufacturers and alterers must be equipped with a compliant TPMS (including a malfunction indicator) by September 1, 2008. However, manufacturers may voluntarily certify vehicles to FMVSS No. 138 and earn carry-forward credits for compliant vehicles, produced in excess of the phase-in requirements, that are manufactured between April 8, 2005, and the conclusion of the phase-in.
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snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc posted for all of us...

I guess you never thought of DAGS did you? I thought not.
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Tekkie

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On 1/6/2016 3:30 PM, Tekkie® wrote:

LOL! Do his own research? Ah, you kill me. That's funny.
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On Wed, 06 Jan 2016 03:49:41 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

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I guess a car that can give you everything you want can annoy you about anything you've got.

And somehow it does better after the first one? How is that?
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On 1/5/2016 11:59 PM, Micky wrote:

Heated steering wheel and remote start makes up for some of it though.

You add some air and it does not happen again.
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wrote:

rim/bead juncture - but they don't get any better as the cold weather progresses. Keepint them slightly overinflated keeps them from rolling sideways as much and can reduce the pressure loss significantly.
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Part of the problem is a lot those TPMS were calibrated to come on just below the max cold pressure on the OEM TIRES, not below what was on the B-pillar auto mfg sticker, which is where I keep my tires about 2lbs psi above.
Of course, in this enlightened age second decade of the new millennium, you'd think both mfgs and mechanics would know better, but no. Now I have ASE Certified technicians telling me, on newsgroups like this, and in person, to go by the cold inflation pressure on the basketba- I mean - TIRES. That the B-pillar door sticker pressures are "too low". Who knows more about how a specific model car will be driven - the tire co. or the car co.?!
Needless to say I never let any tech or mechanic TOUCH my tire pressures, or my wife's except when having new tires put on.
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On Wednesday, January 6, 2016 at 7:57:34 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

This part of your sentence doesn't make sense:
"not below what was on the B-pillar auto mfg sticker, which is where I keep my tires about 2lbs psi above."
There's a serious grammatical issue there.
You keeps your tires 2 lbs above *what*? The PSI on the tire? The PSI on the pillar? Is the PSI on the pillar 2 lbs above the PSI on the tire? Something else?
What exactly are you saying?

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DerbyDad03 wrote: "You keeps your tires 2 lbs above *what*? The PSI on the tire? The PSI on the pillar? Is the PSI on the pillar 2 lbs above the PSI on the tire? Something "
Obviously the PSI on the b-pillar. What the car builder recommends. In my case, my tires have "cold pressure max 44psi" stamped on them. My car's door pillar says 30psi cold. I keep them between 32-34psi.
is that better?
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On Wednesday, January 6, 2016 at 9:25:47 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Yes, it's much better than as originally written. Thank you. It does, however, raise another question.
You (rhetorically) asked:
"Who knows more about how a specific model car will be driven - the tire co. or the car co.?!"
I assume the (non-rhetorical) answer is "the car co.?!"
So, why do you increase the pressure to 2 lbs above "the car co.?!" recommendation? In other words, how do *your* driving habits differ from how "the car co.?!" thinks that "specific model car" will be driven, such that you feel the need for 2 lb increase?
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DerbysDad wrote: "I assume the (non-rhetorical) answer is "the car co.?!"
Yes.
"So, why do you increase the pressure to 2 lbs above "the car co.?!" recommendation? In other words, how do *your* driving habits differ from how "the car co.?!" thinks that "specific model car" will be driven, such that you feel the need for 2 lb increase? "
In a lot of cases car mfgs specify pressures tuned more for ride than for handling, etc In my personal experience I've noticed that exactly at those specs, more shoulder wear. So I pump a few extra PSI into them and hit that sweet spot.
Still others recommend the "chalk" test, where you make chalk lines across the treads, drive, and adjust the pressure until the chalk line wears most evenly. Check the pressures at that point, and write them down as ideal for your machine.
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On Wednesday, January 6, 2016 at 2:51:14 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Makes sense.
I run about 2 lbs over the pillar sticker also.
In the winter, I run 3 over. It may not make a difference, but it makes me feel better to have a slightly smaller footprint.
On my (daughter's) 07 Civic, the only vehicle that I can run minus one wheels on, I do that for her snows.
SWMBO just picked up (stole!) a pristine 03 Honda Element AWD (69K miles) that had never seen salt until this month. It came with Dextero DHT2's (Walmart). They are brand new but I don't think she likes them, even in the little bit of snow we have had. I'm torn between a wheel and snow package vs. just getting her some decent all-weather tires and selling the DHT2's while they are still in decent shape. I'm sure the DHT2's will wear sooner than I'd like and I'll be replacing them in a year or two anyway.
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On 01/06/2016 01:23 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

The auto company recommendations are written by lawyers to protect the auto company from litigation.
I know a guy that runs 46 psi in his car tires. He claims the increased fuel mileage more than offsets the decreased tire life. OTOH, I would think 46 psi would yield poor braking performance...not a trade-off I'd be willing to make.
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On Wed, 6 Jan 2016 05:31:58 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

He CLAIMS the tpms is set 2 psi below the sidewall rating, where it should be 2psi below the sticker rating.
He SAYS he runs his tires 2psi over the sticker rating, which is still less than 2psi below the sidewall rating.
I guess he's too stupid to read his operators manual. He' (and most of the rest of you) have never heard about TPMS calibration??????
You can calibrate your TPMS to just about any pressure you want on virtually any car equipped with factory TPMS system
For a GM truck, here is the procedure.
1. Over-inflate all 4 tires to 50PSI. Leave the valve stem caps off. 2. Apply the parking brake on the truck. 3. Turn the key in the IGN to the ON position (not running) 4. Press and hold the LOCK & UNLOCK at the SAME TIME on your KeyFob for approx. 3 seconds. 5. You will hear the horn chirp twice and if you have a DIC, it will display something about the tire recalibration learning mode active. 6. Start with your DRIVERS SIDE FRONT wheel. Let air out of the tire (deflate) for approx. 15-20 seconds (literally, it takes that long). You will hear the horn chirp ONCE. 7. Next go to the PASSENGER SIDE FRONT wheel. Deflate for 15-20 seconds or until you hear the horn chip ONCE. 8. Next go to the PASSENGER SIDE REAR wheel. Deflate for 15-20 seconds or until you hear the horn chip ONCE. 9. Next go to the DRIVERS SIDE REAR wheel. Deflate for 15-20 seconds or until you hear the horn chip TWICE. 10. Turn the key to the off position. 11. Inflate your tires to the proper PSI. 12. Turn your truck on and you should no longer have a TPMS light on if all 4 sensors are working properly.
Notes: You have 2 minutes to do the first tire after putting the truck into tire recalibration learning mode. It will time out after 2 minutes. You have 5 minutes to do all 4 tires before it times out. You need to do this every time you rotate your wheels or your DIC will think your front wheels are your rear wheels.
Now I don't want to hear any more moronic bitching about TPMS systems!!!!
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca posted for all of us...

+1000 you lead them to water...
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Tekkie

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On 1/6/2016 7:57 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Reminds me, years ago, took my new car on a 1,000 mile trip and checked tires a while later. They were set 10 lb above recommendation. I questioned dealer about that and was told that they were set high at factory for long ship ride and keeping in lots until sold to assure pressure would not need to be increased. That was before TPMS.
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included resetting the tire pressures - and didn't do it.
Not a very good dealer. I PDS'd hundreds of new cars during my career as a mechanic.
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