Slide In Range Or Separate Cooktop and Oven

Hi,
We could use advice from someone who has already made a choice between a range and separate cooktop and oven. We were going to have a separate cooktop and under the counter oven installed in an apartment being finished. The cooktop will be on a peninsula so I will be able to face guests while cooking. Having the oven separate so my knees aren't being baked nor blocking the oven seemed like a good idea. However, the cost will be about two or three times that of a slide in range. The apartment is in Ecuador and availability is less and costs are higher. Could we get some input?
Thanks, Gary
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It’s good that you’re not putting all your eggs in one basket so that if one breaks-down the other will still be available to use. If you’re going to have them separate then make sure that their color or finish will be something that you can easily find again one day if you ever have to replace one or the other so that they will match.
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On Mon, 19 Mar 2012 08:41:38 -0700 (PDT), Molly Brown

You mean like our first house (avocado 'fridge and harvest gold stove)?
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If the only option is to have the oven under the counter regardless of where it goes, then having it as one unit would seem to have the advantage of 1/2 to 1/3 the cost and not much disadvantage. On the other hand, if you were talking about a counter top range and an oven located in the wall, preferably double ovens, then I'd say that arrangement is superior. Having the primary oven up higher where you can access it better is a big plus, IMO.
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I was just over a friend's "new to him" house.
There is a gas cooktop in a peninsula that has stools for sitting on the living room side.
He also has a gas range (cooktop and oven) on the back wall of the kitchen.
He also has 2 kids, ages 5 and 3.
They are considering pulling the cooktop and replacing it with a cutting board because they do not plan to use the cooktop on the peninsula until the kids are old enough that the parents don't have to keep constant watch on them when the cooktop is in use. The kids like to sit/eat at the peninsula while mom and dad are cooking, so they will not use the cooktop if the kids are anywhere near it.
I mention this just in case your guests will include kids that could be severly injured by boiling water, splashed grease, etc.
When I first saw the cooktop in the peninsula I didn't like it because I know what would happen in my house - and I'm only speaking for myself: The peninsula would become a collection place for mail, newspapers, etc. That is not a place that should be shared with flames.
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You really have to search for decent buys on separates. I wanted a gas stove, electric oven.
Greg
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We have a "dual fuel" oven. Works great. We'll undoubtedly buy another for the new house but we'll have to plumb in propane, again.
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Snowy wrote:

Ovens are well insulated. Your knees won't get warm while the oven is on and you're stirring a pot.
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wrote:

I'd go with the range. I'd rather have the cooktop on an outside wall with a vent than a peninsula. If I'm cooking I can't be looking at my guest, If I'm able to talk, I can turn around.
Unless you are putting on a display or filming a cooking show, I think the splatter and mess of the range is best contained.
Ovens are well insulated and we've never found it to be too hot to stand at the range for cooking.
If you had a wall oven, that may change things. Under the counter is still under the counter and too low.
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On 3/19/2012 10:56 AM, Snowy wrote:

Unfortunately we have made that choice in a kitchen remodel done about 6 years ago. Basically separate appliances (oven separate from cook top as a starting point) are just a money pit. So called standard sizes go out the window. Check out the price of a simple thing like the difference of a 36" or 42' exhaust fan (or microwave/exhaust combo) vs. a common 30" big box unit if you are in doubt (3x-10x).
Believe me they don't work any better, the cheapo 30" unit will cook your food every bit as good as the 'Jen-Air' crap . Do what you want but be prepared to spend *big bucks* for the *big bling* kitchen. Turn off the tube and quit watching the 'what is the latest' in home design and just use common sense.
John
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re: "Check out the price of a simple thing like the difference of a 36" or 42' exhaust fan..."
I would imagine that there would be quite a price difference between a 36 inch fan and a 42 foot fan. ;-)
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wrote:

http://www.bigassfans.com/residential/index.html
;-)
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Wall ovens come in standard sizes of 30 and 36. Cooktops come in standard sizes too, just like all kitchen appliances.
Check out the price of a simple thing like the difference of

There is no huge difference in the cost of a range hood that is 30 or 36. Yes, the larger one will cost somewhat more, but it's not some exponential increase. Now if you compare a cheapo 30 that looks like hell to a nice, stylish, high-end 36, that's a different story.

But a 36" oven is substantially larger than a 30" one. And with dual ovens, you have two available, which if you entertain or cook a lot is a plus. And it sure is easier moving food into and out of a wall oven compared to one in a standalone stove.

Having a seperate cook top and wall ovens isn't what I'd call a big bling kitchen. There are modest cost appliances that fit that bill. And for something that lasts 20 years and adds value to a house, it can be well worth it. I just put a dual 36" wall oven in my kitchen and it cost me $1300. More than an stove, but not a huge expense.
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On 3/19/2012 10:56 AM, Snowy wrote:

I don't see the value of what you are describing.
I think the only way a separate oven makes sense is if it is mounted high. That way it is a lot easier to manipulate or remove stuff.
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On 3/19/2012 10:56 AM, Snowy wrote:

I vote for 2 separate units and have done it that way in this house and in my previous house (during a remodel), but a lot depends on what you want. we mounted the wall oven higher than under the counter height because it is easier to put stuff in and remove it. In both kitchens we mounted the microwave over the wall oven. As we are both short and we do use our microwave for lots of stuff, a microwave is definitely not good over the cooktop or stove ... it's way too high. So, what we have is a nice compromise, the oven could be a little higher and the microwave could be a little lower, but it works well for us. https://picasaweb.google.com/actodesco/OurFranklinHouse#5381339564412068834
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