Shelf life of plaster

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:wrote: :
:> :>:Dan_Musicant writes::>: :>:> The pool supply places say they don't carry it ...:>: :>:That's odd. It is a necessary ingredient to protect any plaster pool :>:surface from soft-water etching. Maybe the pool supply places are in the :>:replastering business, too.:>: :>:Another source is concrete suppliers, where it is used as an accelerant.:>: :>:I would also ask at an Agway feed store type place.:>: :>:Or just the 42 oz DampRid refill at Home Depot. :>I called HD, but they couldn't find it. Orchard Supply tells me they :>have calcium chloride in 26 oz. packages for $3.99. I think I may get a :>couple of those. Cheaper and faster than eBay.: :rice is pretty hygroscopic.
Yes, I always have some in my salt shakers. Would it make a decent dessicant?
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your plaster is sitting in its bag in your garage absorbing moisture from the air and getting ruined. I told you a week ago what you needed to preserve it. Buy the damn bucket and lid, and be done with it.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Sat, 09 Sep 2006 11:56:02 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:
: :>: :>:rice is pretty hygroscopic.:> :>Yes, I always have some in my salt shakers. Would it make a decent:>dessicant? :> :While you're farting around looking for a dessicant which you don't even need, :your plaster is sitting in its bag in your garage absorbing moisture from the :air and getting ruined. I told you a week ago what you needed to preserve it. :Buy the damn bucket and lid, and be done with it.
Actually, I already had the dessicant as of about 4 days ago. However, I hadn't seen the sun for several days and didn't want to repackage the plaster in cool, moist conditions and decided to wait for the sun to return, which it did yesterday afternoon. I started this thread with no idea of using a dessicant, only solid plastic containers. However, I thought it best to ask about the whys and wherefores on the subject stated in the subject of this thread.
I only got the idea to include dessicant on recommendation from obviously knowledgable posters in this thread. I already had the plastic containers I intended to use. They may or may not be as air tight as the $8 plastic 5 gallon containers I could buy at Home Depot or similar, but they will undoubtedly be more convenient to use. They are approximately 1 gallon containers.
I'm glad I included dessicant (CaCl2), and have an idea that I did the right thing.
Not that I haven't been guilty of "farting around" on some jobs.
I also decided not to keep the plaster in my garage after all. I have the 1 gallon plastic containers (12 of them for the 100 lb. of plaster) stored in the house, under a stairwell. There will be MUCH less moisture to deal with there, at least until the garage is renovated.
Dan
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I didn't catch your location, nut if you live in an area that gets snow, you should be able to find CaCl2 pretty cheap, it's often sold as a deicer for driveways & sidewalks.
I have to agree with the other poster who said that no dessicant is necessary, though. I keep small quantities of mortar mix, sakrete, etc. in old, cleaned 5 gal paint or drywall buckets, and haven't seen any go bad for periods of at least a couple-few years. If your just talking about a small box or bag of patching plaster or plaster of paris, you could also just put it in a heavy-duty zip lock bag.
3D 3D in old 5 gal paint containe
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Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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Dan_Musicant writes:

No. Calcium hypochlorite is an elemental chlorine source. You don't want that near anything or even inside the house.
You want calcium chloride. Any pool supply place will have that. Perhaps they're too typically ignorant to know the chemical name. They might only know it as some variation of the words "calcium hardness increaser." Look on the bag or tub for a chemical ingredient.
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wrote:
:Dan_Musicant writes: : :> A pool supply place I'm talking to doesn't have it but they stock :> calcium hypochlorite, which he says is a "pool shocker" or some such :> thing. Is that a dessicant (i.e. OK) ...: :No. Calcium hypochlorite is an elemental chlorine source. You don't want :that near anything or even inside the house. : :You want calcium chloride. Any pool supply place will have that. Perhaps :they're too typically ignorant to know the chemical name. They might only :know it as some variation of the words "calcium hardness increaser." Look :on the bag or tub for a chemical ingredient. The guy I had on the phone was far from knowledgable. Sounded like a kid. He said to call tomorrow (which is today) and ask for his boss, which I'm going to do right now...
I talk to him and he says they don't supply it. It's a place called HD Pool and Patio Supply. I ask him for recommendations near me and he gives me the name of a place that's around 15 miles from me. I think I'll try looking up wholesale chemicals warehouses. I bought some chemical some years ago from such a place and thought it reasonable.
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Why bother, Dan? You _don't_need_it_. An airtight container is all you need.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Wed, 06 Sep 2006 19:13:31 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:
:Why bother, Dan? You _don't_need_it_. An airtight container is all you need. I can and may well just try that. I can test my plaster if I'm nervous. Thanks.
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Yes, absolutely. In an air-tight container, it will stay fresh for a long time (at least two years, in my experience, and I live in an area with fairly humid summers).

Temperature doesn't really matter that much. What's important is keeping it dry.

It's better to use your plaster as soon as possible after opening the bag, but the stuff will keep a long time as long as you keep it dry.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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wrote:

It will keep longer in an airtight container with dessicant, but still not forever. Plaster is cheap. Give the excess to your kids to play with.
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