Sheetrock repair question

I had to cut an 18x18 hole in the wall to repair the plumbing (@#$% plastic pipe anyhow...).
Now I have the challenge of repairing the hole. I can use some 2x2s or 2x4s to build a frame around the hole to attach the sheet rock to, and while a bit of work it's not too bad and will work. Are there any other ways to put a big chunk of sheetrock back in place that would be less work? Clips to hold in in place, etc.?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/4/2010 4:33 PM, Zootal wrote:

Why don't you install a paintable access panel so you can get to it again? The big box stores stock them as I recall.
http://www.divplastics.com/products/ezaccess/index.cfm
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's not really a good location - there is a sink and cabinet that goes on the wall that I patched. Though honestly I love the idea - I always thought it was somewhat stupid to put wiring and plumbing in walls and then seal them so you can't do maintanence on them. How many here have had to rip out a wall so they could get to the plumbing or wiring?
Yeah, yeah, I know - most plumbing and wiring never needs maintenance, so why install a gazillion access panels that will never be needed?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/8/2010 4:02 PM, Zootal wrote:

I had to replace the 1" water pressure regulator at a service station some years ago. I found it inside a wall under a sink, I darn sure installed an access panel on that job. Besides, if you are of that persuasion, it makes a great stash. :-)
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/8/2010 5:14 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Well, it used to, till you blabbed it to the whole world.
--
aem sends...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

18x18 would normally hit some framing, but even if it doesn't I'd just screw some scrap plywood strips around the perimeter on the backside of the drywall. If it's a ceiling and the framing is 24 OC I'd probably throw in some 2x material bridging across the opening to reduce the risk of sagging.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The studs here come in different spacing - I'm not sure what they were thinking when they put the walls up...
But this is what I ended up doing. Scrap plywood strips screwed to the existing sheetrock so they extend into the hole so that I can screw the patch to them work very well.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I will usually cut a rectangle piece out so that it falls over the nearest framing members. I feel this is a better repair than putting unsupported pieces behind the rock. I often use a steel ruler and a utility knife and just score repeatedly till you cut through.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Now is not a great time to learn this:
When you cut the hole, bevel the cuts toward the center of the piece. One of the multitools does this extraordinarily well. With care, you can keep the original piece without damaging it. An application of DAP or similar will "glue" the piece back into the hole. A bit of touch up paint, but if the wall is white to off white, may not need any.
Another good trick is to cut the patch 4" larger than the hole. Cut the back side of the rock to size to fit the hole, peel off the drywall leaving a 2" flap of finish paper around the perimeter. Scrape back the texture around the hole, butter well with compound, install the plug, striking the paper tight to the wall. This will be much tighter than the build up you will get by taping and bedding on top of the drywall.
Neither system requires any fasteners and make quite sound repairs.
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
DanG
Keep the whole world singing . . .
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/4/2010 3:27 PM DanG spake thus:

That method is called a "dutchman", and it's a good way to repair rectangular holes up to about 2' square in drywall. Very easy to mud and finish, and plenty strong enough.
--
How To Access Wikileaks

These sites are still up as of 12/3/10:
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
plastic

In the past I would say 18x18 should have caught at least one stud but that may not be true today.
All you need is: drywall screws 2 24" scraps of wood, 1x4 works well the drywall you cut out or replacement piece. drywall tools tape and mud.
Set the two pieces (scabs) of 1x4 on each side of the hole extending 3" above and below. Secure each with two screws at the top and bottom though the existing wall. Add the 18x18 piece, secure to the scabs with screws. Tape and mud applied in thin coats over several days.
I have pictures for an article I have yet to write. Be glad to answer questions here or share them.
--
Colbyt
Please come visit http://www.househomerepair.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
plastic

I would fix it by the following method:
Cut two 1x3's or 4's two inches longer than the hole. Slide them in the hole, first upward until it all goes in then downward until the one by is inside the hole. Fasten along one edge with drywall screws through the drywall, leaving half the width of the one by inside the drywall, and half showing in the hole. Put the other one in the same way. Cut a patch to fit, or just reinstall the piece you cut out, and screw it to the two one by's. Patch with some tape, mud, let dry, repeat, until acceptable visibly, then retexture. The one bys will hold it solid, and you can even put them on all four side on a hole that big so it doesn't crack.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The trick, for future reference, is to cut a patch piece first, then use that as a template for your wall cut. Make all the cuts on an angle, so that the patch wedges into the hole, then trim for 1/16 - 1/8 of relief for mud. -----
- gpsman
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Zootal wrote:

Yes, clips are available from many sources.
See:
http://www.acehardware.com/product/index.jsp?productId '23877&CAWELAID9397899
http://tinyurl.com/2c5lvcx
Good luck with the repair,
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.