sheetrock over popcorn ceiling

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I don't think you'll have a problem with putting up sheetrock. Most new owners don't pull down ceilings. Worst case scenario is that the new homeowner sues you for not disclosing the asbestos and you settle with them for the actual cost. Most homeowners are not going to hire a lawyer and deal with the hassles to collect 5k. They may take you to small claims court but most people don't have the time for it. I don't think it is a problem and I think you're making things better by covering the asbestos with sheetrock. But make your own deciscion.
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On 20 Oct 2003 21:10:45 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Actor 123) wrote:

Well you could consider 2x4 soft ceiling tiles. You could make your own supports (dado narrow strips of wood) for it but I have seen suspended ceiling metal frames attached directly to the ceiling with staples. Either way you would only lose an inch and disturb the asbestos far less than you will by trying to drywall.
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There is nothing worng with covering the asbestos but you would have to disclose it when you sell. I agree sometimes the EPA and OSHA goes a little overboard with this stuff but it is for our safety. If it were mine i would wet it down and scrape it off and dispose of it legally.
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...

So would I
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What kind of depth are we talking about here if you were to fill in the voids? Also how much of the surface is extruded? 25% 50%? I'm asking because I'm wondering how much material it would take to fill in the void. Could the ceiling be "floated" with drywall filler to a reasonable smoothness, and then meshed and prepped for stucco?
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Luckily, the popcorn layer isn't all that thick. Maybe 1/4" only. I would think that yes, one could use drywall filler to make it smooth. The problem I would foresee with that is in making it level over the course of the very big room. Popcorn does have one advantage, in that it does tend to hide any imperfections in the ceiling. I'd be worried that making it flat by using filler alone would be next to impossible.
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I think this is the best option. I know of this being done. When wet down, it comes off fairly easily, doesn't float around in the air tho you want to wear protective mask at least, is one heck of a mess but you are rid of it, no disclosure concerns.
"Mudding" over it with drywall compound is not an option unless you are a plasterer. Your odds of getting a decent looking finish are minimal, odds of finishing joints satisfactorly without a pro are also minumal.
Walt Conner
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Still not an option as you'd have adhesion problems. The popcorn will start to fall off when damp from the mud and they your have a catastrophic problem instead of inconvenience. Ed
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Hey why don't we all go over there this Saturday. We could have it done in a half a day for a few beers and some pizza. :-)
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That's right, I thought of that too late to include.
Walt Conner
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wrote in message

from certified contractors and/or permitted operations. OP says he can not get a permit to do the work himself, and if he did it on the sly, he probably wouldn't be able to get rid of the waste legally. One could always just dump it in the local landfill, but heaven help you if it is discovered that you have done so.
Here are the issues as I see them:
1. You will have to disclose no matter what you do. You know it is there, so you have to tell. If it hasn't been painted yet, at minimum you will probably have to paint to encapsulate before selling.
2. You can not legally DIY. (You are ethical enough that you will not do it on the sly [good for you])
3. You have a valid concern about the finished results if you just add another layer of sheetrock, especially since it doesn't have to be very thick and will thus be more flexible.
4. Since you only have 8' to play with, you are justly concerned about losing any space to strapping, etc. before hanging the sheetrock.
Have you considered a) Just getting a plaster crew in to skimcoat the existing popcorn? That would certainly encapsulate, and a good plaster crew would leave the surface as smooth as a good sheetrock job. b) Go ahead and rock over with thin sheetrock, then have the plasterers do a skim coat before painting to even up any irregularities?
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"Have you considered a) Just getting a plaster crew in to skimcoat the existing popcorn?"
This has been covered 2 - 3 times, it will most likely absorb the moisture from the skim coat and come down. There is only paint holding all of this up there. Unfortunately, like many things, the Gov., EPA in particular, has made far too much fuss about this. Illegal Aliens are much more dangerous to all of us than asbestos if any sense at all is used handling it.
Walt Conner
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Your choices are to have it removed or shim the ceiling and sheetrock. Another alternative is to mix paint with spackle compound and coat it over the popcorn.

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