Sewer pipe failing - suggestions?

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rangerssuck wrote:

Okay. Screwy idea #2.
Get some day laborers from your local Home Depot parking lot to dig up the existing line. Lay a new line.
My son did that (sort of). His next-door neighbor (from Guatemala) dug up about 60' of sewer line and replaced it with some sort of heavy-duty PVC-looking stuff. Total charge was $500.
Screwy idea #3
My city replaced the sanitary sewer main serving my home not long ago. The original line was 8" concrete pipe. They replaced it with 10" PVC-looking plastic. What was novel, was they did it without digging up the original! Here's how they did it.
They started at one end of the block and PUSHED (more like hammered) to new pipe in place. As it moved along, it fractured and split the old concrete pipe. Then the contractor came along with an itty-bitty Bobcat, dug down 8' to the new line and attached each individual home to the new pipe. After that, another crew followed, repairing fences and re-sodding the yards where they dug access pits.
Point is, there may be a similar service available to you.
Keep looking.
Screwy idea #4
Sell the house and move on.
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On Apr 25, 4:07 pm, snipped-for-privacy@toyotamail.com wrote:

As I explained, the problem is that the chimney was sized for the furnace and water heater. The furnace requires a flue much larger than the water heater. With just the water heater left on a large chimney, in winter the combustion gases will cool off in the chimney and condense into acidic water. Over time that destroys the mortar in the flue joints. With the furnace there, it was also operating during the winter keeping the chimney warm enough so that condensation doesn't occur.
It won't cause the chimney to fail next year, but over time it will likely take it's toll.

Those joints inside the chimney are the ones I'm talking about.

The exhaust consists of gases which condense when it cools. With natural gas, the resulting condensate is acidic.

They are sold, approved, labeled by the safety agencies for that use. What you are referring to is galvanic corrosion. That requires that two different metals be in contact through an electrolyte. A dielectric can be used to seperate the metals. But in the case of the connection to the water heater vent, there is no electrolyte. If just two different metals being in contact resulted in corrosion all kinds of everyday things would be failing, but they don't.

That a valid option.

As I said, if they were saying other repairs were needed to the chimney itself and they were not, I agree that's a scam. But if they said the chimney needs a liner with just the gas water heater left on it, that's not a scam. It's sound practice.
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That's a big price shift, from $7,700 to free. Thanks for the follow up, field report.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

he said, "Call Matt at Bardia." Of course I had no idea who Matt was or where Bardia was, but he gave the his phone number, and off I
Long story short, Matt said that if this were his house, he'd just leave it alone, but if it would make me (and my wife) more comfortable, running a snake through the pipe would cost under a couple of hundred bucks, and since his machine is currently broken, he referred me to another plumber.
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sewer line with tree roots? no problem it becomes a maintence issue.
just put rock salt water down the sewer 4 or 5 times a year, espically early spring right before trees leaf out. do this as last person leaves for day, so the salty water kills the roots but leaves trees unharmed......
must be over 15 years of me doing this. we dont have the bucks to replace the line
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Yeah... and it's JUST FINE for cast iron pipes, too! (not!)
There are relatively inexpensive organo-phosphate based sewer root killers that do the same thing. Although they're mildly low in pH, the little bit of acidic state they present won't corrode iron pipes like salt will.
LLoyd
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On Sat, 23 Jun 2012 14:33:22 -0500, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote Re Re: Followup: Sewer pipe failing - suggestions?:

Bullshit.
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http://propertyblotter.com/2008/03/25/the-peril-of-orangeburg-yes-cardboard-crumbles /
Since this subject has been opened, does anyone here have any experience with this Orangeburg sewer pipe. My home was built in '58, and the French drains around the full basement outside the base of the wall feed out into a leach field. Also 3 basement floor drains. From the drain at the bottom of the basement steps outside, I apparently have this type pipe to the leach field. Had it cleaned twice to remove roots over the past 10 yrs., and slivers of the paper/bitumen material came out the last time about 6 inches long. The man who does the pipe cleaning is knowledgeable and said he's sure I have the Orangeburg pipe. This drain line is at least 6 ft. deep at the basement steps to a depth of approx. 2 ft. 150 ft. out to the leach field. Under buried lines to field hydrants and electrical cable to the garage. Ugly job to replace, big time. Is there a way to pull a liner through inside the deteriorating pipe? It's grey water from the washer/basement shower, and water from the French drains after heavy rains. Not sewage. Any ideas welcomed.
Garrett Fulton
"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" wrote in message

Yeah... and it's JUST FINE for cast iron pipes, too! (not!)
There are relatively inexpensive organo-phosphate based sewer root killers that do the same thing. Although they're mildly low in pH, the little bit of acidic state they present won't corrode iron pipes like salt will.
LLoyd
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orangeberg is all bad news, just dig it all up and replace.......
in the pittsburgh area cast iron isnt used below grade, its nearly all terracotta, clay tile which isnt effected by rock salt.....
and even if it were, the lne is getting replaced anyway, so what do you have to lose??
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Here in the San Francisco Bay Area there are Co's that only dig up the ends of the lines, feed in replacement pipe with a head that expands breaking the old line so the new pipe can be pulled in behind. I have not seen it in action. Just word of mouth from a friend. CP
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Pilgrim wrote:

My city did that to the sanitary sewer in my neighborhood. The original was (I believe) 8" concrete. The replacement was 10 or 12" plastic of some kind.
THUMP-THUMP-THUMP went the machine for hours 'til they had the entire block done. The contractors came along with an itty-bitty back hoe, dug up the individual connections, and attached the intervening houses to the new line.
Then they covered up their mess, laid new sod, and repaired the fences they had to take down for access.
I was impressed.
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Many pipes are left in place and a sleeve is inserted into the existing pipe. This is done after a PIG is run through cutting all of the roots and obstacles and flushing them down the tubes.
I liked what I saw the Phone company did - put in a grid array of tubes using concrete array of tubes something like 64 tubes in a square - each placed and sealed to another end-to-end.
It allows expansion of more fibre lies and rental to other custom lines.
Martin
On 6/23/2012 11:14 PM, Pilgrim wrote:

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rangerssuck wrote:
My daughter bought a house last year. Some people recommended the pipe video, and since I earlier had a house with horrible sewer pipe problems, I urged her to do it. The pipe was rusted through in two places, where traps were under the floor slab. The seller ended up footing the bill for the repairs, which ran about a grand, I think. The plumber did a good job, just broke two small holes in the slab to access the traps. If you didn't know where to look, you'd miss the repairs.
The rest of the drain line was installed about 20 years ago when the area went from septic tank to sewer mains, it was PVC and in good shape.
So, it was a very CHEAP $200 inspection for us. We got a DVD of the whole inspection.
Jon
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