Sewer gas coming up out of washing machine drain tube

It's me again! Thanks to everyone for the advice on the stove cord. I'll have to hit up an electrical supply or hardware store this weekend (holiday closures permitting) and do it *right*.
In the meantime, in the laundry room (which is its own source of frustration- stay tuned and I'll abuse you folks with that story soon enough) I believe we're detecting a semi-pungent 'sewer gas' type aroma. It's not thick and heavy, but enough to notice. *My* nose doesn't work very well, and at first i thought it was the new carpet we put in several rooms- the new carpet smells weird compared to what I remember carpet smelling like and it stunk up the whole house for awhile after it was installed.
So anyways, the bathroom is upstairs in this house. The bathroom area is 'partitioned' with a small wall and thus creates a "laundry room". The washer drain goes into a piece of PVC pipe that has been routed thru the partition wall, behind the toilet, and into a 6" or so vertical vent pipe in the corner. I realize that pictures would be worth a thousand words right now, but I haven't unpacked a camera yet. So, if it is sewer gas and not the carpet i'm smelling, should I:
1) put a trap in the PVC (it has none) and buy some beer 2) put some sort of one-way check valve in the PVC and buy some beer 3) duct tape or otherwise seal the hose into the PVC and buy some beer 4) buy some votive candles and beer.
This sewer gas type smell doesn't *appear* to be coming from anywhere else- i just sniffed around for awhile and right behind the washer is where it's the worst. Is there a way to positively test for gas backup? Once or twice I thought I smelled something foul by the kitchen sink, but who knows what dangers lurk in the rancid bowels of a sink....For all I know, since the house sat unused for months the water in the trap could have evaporated out of it and let some gas out, but now that we've used the sink it's fine.
That's for another day and different beer...
Thanks in advance for any and all....
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5) buy some beer and to hell with the other options.
First choice is #5, but I think #1 may be the best long term solution.
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The washer drain definitely needs a trap, which is there to block sewer gas from coming in. Sounds like whoever did the install was a hack.
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As I mentioned, the entire "laundry area" is a source of frustration. There's plenty more to this issue. My guess is that the upstairs area has been rearranged at least once, and either the bathroom or laundry room are an afterthought.
Fun fun!
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phaeton wrote:

The fix is #1. The problem is you may still have a problem as it may also require some vent changes. Best bet on this one is to get a real plumber to come out and take a look. It is hard to give enough advice over the internet.
I have to agree with the comment about the competence and or honesty of the one that put it in.

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Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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d> The fix is #1. The problem is you may still have a problem as it may

over
of
I agree. But you may be able to add a vent with one of those watco spring loaded guys if you really need it. For cheapness and speed just add a trap and see what happens. If you have to cut it out and redo you are out $5 worth of PVC.
Where are we drinking that beer? :)))
Colbyt
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There is fairly readily available a book on simple plumbing with code. The sort of Do-it-yourself sold in a lot of the building supply places like Lowes.
1. You need a trap. 2. Depending on the distance you may need another vent pipe.
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Distance-wise i think from washing machine drain tube to vent pipe is under 6 feet. I'll check out the book(s).
Thanks.
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wrote:

5] Go to the hardware store and buy a small rubber thing made to seal the laundry hose to the pipe. They are sold just for that purpose. They are gray rubber-like material. They slip over the 1 1/2" PVC, and the approx. 1 inch hose fits into it. There is a hose clamp on both sides of it. Problem solved !!!
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snipped-for-privacy@er.com wrote:

Hi, That's stop gap solution. The drain should have P trap. I don't know why it doesn't? Tony
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I do agree it SHOULD have a trap. I'm wondering if it's a trailer home. Most of the older trailers did NOT have traps. I lived in one, I did not have a trap on the washing machine pipe, so I used one of those rubber devices. One day I was working on the pipes under the tub and decided to add a trap since that was the same set of pipes anyhow. I still kept that rubber (like a Fernco) on there. At least if there is a sewer clog, the wash water wont back up out of that pipe, and is most likely to back up into the bathtub instead. (Much less mess).
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"5] Go to the hardware store and buy a small rubber thing made to seal the laundry hose to the pipe. They are sold just for that purpose. They are gray rubber-like material. They slip over the 1 1/2" PVC, and the approx. 1 inch hose fits into it. There is a hose clamp on both sides of it. Problem solved !!! "
Unless the sewer gas then makes it's way out of the washer itself. Plus, if the house gets an inspection when you decide to sell it, this is something obvious that will get flagged without having a trap.
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"stand pipe" with trap see: http://doityourself.com/appliance/irpwasher.htm
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wrote:

5) They all agree. I'm almost sure they're right, but I'd do a load of laundry first. Just like your kitchen smell went away when you used the kitchen, maybe this will.
I can't be sure from what you wrote that you don't already have a trap on this line, and although it seems it would take a long time for all the water to evaporate, it doesn't have to be all the water. The level just has to go below the top inside line of the bottom of the pipe.

Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let me know if you have posted also.
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It's connected to the vent pipe (T or Y and a reducer)? Or someone just hacked a hole into the vent and shoved the PVC into it? Either way why would anyone expect that sewer gas *woudn't* come out? Put a trap in the line.
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