Service panel distance from floor??

I am upgrading my 60 amp fuse service entrance to a new 100 amp service with breaker panel. The basement in the house is only about four feet from floor to ceiling (bottom of floor joists). It's not much higher than a typical crawl space.
Because the service entrance cable will run accross the top of the doorway, I am concerned about it being hit by people and/or objects being carried in or out of the 'basement'. Therefore, I planned to run the service entrance cable inside 2 inch pvc conduit inside the basement. However, the 2" 90 degree fitting used to make the transition from horizontal to vertical and into the top of the panel box, has such a large radius that I can only get the bottom of the panel box about one foot off the floor.
The 'basement' is dry, concrete floor, and is equiped with a sump pump - but I'm concerned that the panel being so close to the floor might cause the installation to fail inspection. Should I be concerned??
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with
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in
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You should be concerned that you are running the service entrance cable so far. Run the whole thing past the inspector, since the distance you can run is up to him.
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I'm not sure what you mean by 'so far'?
The distance, from where the service entrance cable enters the basement, to the top of the panel box is only about six or seven feet. Total distance from meter box to panel box is only about twelve feet. That's total linear feet of cable, not just straight-line point A to point B.
The new panel is only slightly relocated from the old, and this was necessary because the old panel was too close (practicaly right on top of ) the gas service entrance and meter.
I do plan to consult the inspector, but I stumbled accross this newsgroup while searching for info on the subject, so I thought I'd post the question anyway.
Thanks for the input.

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question
Unless there is a main circuit breaker outside or right where the cable enters the basement (as mentioned by another poster), you are running a cable with no short / ground protection inside your house. The NEC does not set a specific limit on how far the service equipment (main breaker would qualify) can be from the cable entry, they leave it up to the local inspector. However, the general tone of the NEC is to get it protected as soon as it enters the building, or, if you have to extend it, running it in a concrete vault!!
I would be very concerned about the six or seven feet and the doorway. It is much better to speak with the inspector before you do the work and find out what is acceptable to him.
And then, if I remember correctly, there is the issue of service wires being sized somewhat smaller than wires would be in an inside run of the same amperage.
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90
and
get
why are you putting it in the crawlspace? do you want to crawl in there every time somethin trips or you need to cut power? Are you trying to keep existing wires? if so, you're not doing a lot of good if you upgrade to 100A from 60. I'm doing that right now and I'm changing every wire because there were a total of 3 wires feeding the whole appartment.

I put my panel in the second floor appartment and the cable anters the house in the basement. Right after the cable enters the basement, there's a main 100A breaker, and then the cable continues upstairs. This is the legal way to do it, according to the electricians I spoke to.
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First, what are you using for cable? If it's just three individual #4 insulated copper wires, 1 1/4" pvc should be sufficient. I know that for fact, I just installed this in a barn and used 1 1/4" pvc.
Next dont use an elbow, use an LB. That will make feeding the wires thru the pvc easier.
I think 1 foor off the floor is much too close to the floor.
Finally, what if you put the box right at ceiling height and run the pvc directly into the side of the box.
On Fri, 07 Nov 2003 04:42:14 GMT, "michael beckwith"

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An "LB" is an L with the cover on the back. An LL is an L with the cover on the left side. An LR has it's cover on the right side. The sides are identified by holing the L by its right angle end, conduit hub down, and pointing it away from you. If he has the L close to the ceiling he will need an LL or an LR. -- Tom
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On Fri, 07 Nov 2003 04:42:14 GMT, "michael beckwith"

Just a suggestion. 200 amp isn't much more expensive and you'll have a better service and easier time selling the place. If you have any electric appliances and especially heat/air you'll be glad you did.

Might look into specialy fittings, or see if your jurisdiction will allow a sideways mount panel.

Will your local codes even allow a service panel installed there? If so, there shouldn't be a problem. I assume you're installing where the old fuse panel was, or pretty near it.
Locally we'd be required to relocate it, but then we don't have basements and we do have flood surges... :)
Bottom line: Call and ask first.
Jeff
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