Semi-transparent stain on pressure-treated green board

Contractor put Behr semi-transparent stain on pressure-treated uprights and risers (green board) of my new side steps.
Can instructions say to put only one coat.
(Does not say that about solid stain for Trex steps).
Why the difference.
TIA
Aspasia
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aspasia wrote:

Little late now, but if by "green board" you mean brand new material before it has had a chance to dry, it would have been best to wait...

Multiple coats of semi-transparent --> solid...
The presumption is if you used a semi-transparent stain you don't want the finished surface to look like a solid stain or paint had been used.
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I am not the original poster.
I was under the impression that the second coat might not stick to the first coat, and I might need to sand the first coat before I could apply the second coat. I am glad to hear that this is not the case.
Great. This means I can apply several coats of the semi-transparent stain next time when I stain the deck. I choose semi-transparent stain _not_ for allowing the base color of the wood to show, I prefer to use semi-transparent stain because I am under the impression that semi-transparent stain tends to wear gradually, instead of peeling off in large pieces like the solid paint may do. I am not sure if the semi-transparent stain will still wear gradually if I apply multiple coats instead of just one coat. Hopefully, this will be the case.
Jay Chan
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Generally speaking, it is not wise to put solid stain on horizontal/walking surfaces. It's film is softer than paint and will show a walking path within months. Even dogs toenails will wear a path in a short period of time. On vertical surfaces solid stain over something like T-111 siding will last for 15 or 20 years. Semi-transparent stain will sink into the wood a little better and will tend to fade more than "wear". You should be fine with multiple coats, but do no more than two. BTW, if solid stain "peels", it was definitely applied wrong.

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Thanks for informing me that I can put two coats of semi-transparent stain on deck. This helps.
Jay Chan

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On Fri, 22 Jun 2007 10:47:13 -0400, curmudgeon

I want to be sure you understand what the walking surface is in this case. It's Trex, which is a composite product made of wood and recycled plastics.
<www.trex.com>
Would your comments apply to this product, as well as to ordinary wood?

We're not talking about "regular" wood, but about the composite product sold under various names, Weatherbest, etc. This one is Trex.
I need to learn the distinction between the way between the way solid stain wears on wood, as opposed to on Trex.
I have time to deal with this, as Trex recommends the steps "fade" for 12-16 weeks before painting/staining, but want to Do the Right Thing when the time comes.
Anybody familiar with the effect of solid stain on Trex steps?
TIA
Aspasia
a little better and will tend to fade more than "wear". You should be fine with multiple coats,

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Not relevant. This is pressure-treated wood which, AFAIK, does not need to dry.
Aspasia

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