Scratchy noise from ceiling fan

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I've got a ten-year-old ceiling fan in my bedroom. It was a cheapo to begin with, not a name brand or anything, but it has worked, silently and nicely, operating virtually 100% of the time, for the past ten years.
This morning, I stopped the thing for about 15 minutes to dust it, something that had not been done for several months. When I turned it back on - same speed as before - it was making kind of a scratchy, mildly grating noise as it turned. It wasn't anything bad, like you'd get if the bearings were shot. But it went from being 100% quiet to being pretty scratchy sounding.
I sprayed some WD-40 on the moving parts with the fan stopped, restarted it, and there was no improvement. I do remember reading somewhere once that no attempt should ever be made to lubricate the fan.
I can't imagine that being turned off for 15 minutes, then on again, would so badly degrade this fan's quietness. Any simple things that I might have overlooked that would restore it to its previous glory?
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Chances are you jostled something while cleaning. Turn it off as turn it by hand to see if you can hear where it is rubbing. You may get lucky and just tap it in the right place to clear it up.
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I think I "jostled" some dust into it while cleaning. Hand turning didn't solve the problem, but after running it on the highest speed for a couple hours, the noise is gone.
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On Sun, 22 Aug 2004 15:31:14 GMT, trader-of-some-jacks

WD40 is a water displacement product. It makes a horrible lubricant. It will wash the oil or grease from the part being lubricated then evaporate in short order leaving you with a mess. Its ok for door hinges maybe but don't use it on anything you want to keep.

Check all the screws in the blades to make sure they are tight. Look for any missing screws and also check to see if anything got knocked in the housing and is scraping between the motor and the housing.
Steve B.
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On Sun, 22 Aug 2004 17:22:51 GMT, Steve B. <this is not my real

I've heard this, again and again and again.
Since I use WD40 almost exclusively as a lubricant, I must be very foolish. What exactly is the stuff SUPPOSED to be used for? And is it safe to say that an awful lot of people, like me, are misusing the stuff?
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It's used by the Pro's to remove rust and crap from bolts, screws, fittings and bearings to assist in getting them off. It doesn't work great for that but it works... there are other products available that work a lot better.
As a lubricant, it's a bad idea. It contains a de-greasing agent that will wash all the lubricant out (as the other poster said). The old 3-in-one oil will help bring some life back into old sleeve-bearing motors, but it is not a permanent fix, either.
Jake
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Jake wrote:

It works (on NON-porous surfaces only) as a "label remover" like Goo-B-Gone, etc. Takes that impossible-to-remove stick residue right off. Only problem is that it IS greasy, so you can't use it anywhere it would stain the surface.
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trader-of-some-jacks wrote:

I heard the WD stands for 'water displacement'. The 40 might be a formula number. In other words, the first 39 formulas probably did not work. :-) It was supposed to be used to spray ignition wires, etc. to displace water. It is not designed as a penetrating oil, or light oil, but it is used as such. I just spray my whole engine compartment with spray tire dressing. It works just as well, looks better and lasts longer.
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trader-of-some-jacks wrote:

If it doesn't move, use WD-40.
If it does move, use Duct Tape.
Follow these two rules and you will live a long, happy life.
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Is is good to keep water off things (hence the "doesn't move" comment below).
Also good at removing stickers (bumper stickers, gluey tape residue, etc).
I use WD40 more as a cleaner/solvent than a lube.
Jim
JerryMouse wrote:

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As an "AMT" I use "WD-40" strictly for rubber clamps,ratchets that have fallen in "Jet Fuel" aka kerosene and a "knocker-loose" substitute. Pilots assume ALL the stuff we use is LUBE!!! i.e. could you put some of that wd40 stuff on my rollaround bag wheels (we spend $$$$$ learning to work on 777's 767's MD-80,s and they want us to fix their luggage) So I gladly do it for them! the ONLY good use for 40 is elect cont and H2o displacement.PERIOD oh yeah it makes your aerosol cabinet look colorful! Irish AMT for a MAJOR AMERICAN AIRLINE!
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On Mon, 23 Aug 2004 03:13:02 GMT, "Denise Baker"

I fly for an all night freight carrier... When I used to fly Beechcraft Kingairs.. I was surprised to find that one of the approved chemicals for the airplane was "marvel mystery oil". I don't recall ever seeing which aircraft system this was approved for.. Chuck
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Marvel Mystery Oil is ATF (automatic transmission fluid) in a fancy package.
BB
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-- ...

From the WD-40 web page: With literally thousands of uses, WD-40 is the #1 multi-purpose problem solver. It cleans, protects, penetrates, lubricates and displaces moisture like no other product on earth.
Even more from the WD-40 web page. Who could imagine spring cleaning or summer spruce-ups without WD-40? Whether it's getting things done around the home, office, garage or workshop, WD-40 helps with cleaning and maintenance chores. Use it to:
a.. Clean dirt from power cords a.. Clean gunk from phone keys a.. Remove permanent marker from dry erase boards a.. Polish away scratches on countertops a.. Lubricate spray arm in dishwashers a.. Clean scuff marks from floors a.. Clean and lubricate patio equipment that has been stored during winter
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It works great when I run into a unit that has a wasp nest in it.....
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Owners Manual for DR Mower recommends it for spraying on drive chain periodically. My correct e-mail address is gno52 (not gn52) Fake adddress given to avoid spams
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Then you're foolish. It's a very poor lubricant.
My can of WD-40 must be 15 years old - I rarely use it. I use PB Blaster as a penetrant and other products as lubricants.
WD-40 is good at removing price tags and other stickers but one can will last several lifetimes for that use.
wrote:

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I put a quick spray into my toolbox. Helps keep them from rusting. It's actually better to wipe every tool with a rag dampened with kerosene, then dispose of the rag properly.
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And my can of WD-40 is also about 15 years old. But it does work for some other things - great for locks -- spray on key and turn the lock a number of times -- you won't have to do this again for years. Great for frozen car locks -- again, spray on key. Great for all hinges.
But one can can last forever.
DJ in VA
On 23 Aug 2004 07:16:47 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (davefr) wrote:

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I sometimes use it on rusty bolts when reinstalling them. It lubricates enough to make installation easier.
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