Sale of a house and un-premitted electrical improvements

I made some new electrical circuits in my house, like a garage subpanel for example. I use it to power my electric powered toys in the garage. Needless to say, I never bothered with permits, although, I think, these changes do meet code (I tried to do so). My question is, if I decide to sell my house, is the most sensible thing to just remove the subpanel and the wiring? To not have any possible issues with the inspectors? For typical house owning, TV watching morons, having that subpanel in the garage offers very little value, so, I think, it is easiest to just remove that unpermitted circuit. Good or bad thinking?
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On Mon, 17 Jul 2006 14:59:24 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I recently sold a house that did not have a permit for an inside floor (yes I got beat-up here about permits (grin). I disclosed this issue to the buyer beforehand. The buyer wanted documents related to materials used, statement of work, etc. I did have what they wanted, but not the permit. If necessary I was willing to crawl to the building department and try to rectify the permit issues, including possible fines.
They had a home inspection and was happy.
If you do remove it I suspect you would have to disclose both the install and removal to a buyer, but I'm not a lawyer. You can ask a local Real Estate agent, perhaps.
Oren
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your better off hiring your OWN home inspector to see what issues the buyers one will have.
your inspector can check your install.
then you give potential buyers the inspection they MIGHT be happy with the one you provide.
a inpector who finds lots of even minor troubles can and does scare off buyers. better to fix what you can in advance.
buyers will demand things like registered electrician to replace flakey receptable. whereas you would just go buy and install one.
a pre inspection can save you biig bucks
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On Mon, 17 Jul 2006 14:59:24 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

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Just leave it. If it meet code, it should not be an issue at all. If I was looking to buy your house, that would be a big plus for me. I'm sure it must have been done with a permit, but the paperwork is long gone; you look honest to me.
Go through the house and see what else may be an issue. Correct the little stuff. If the potential buyer wants other work done, let him do it.
My attitude is: This is my price, take it or leave it. If you want me to fix these things, it will add $3000 to the selling price. .
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

I've found myself saying this a lot lately, I agree with Ed. Don't waste time & money fixing, painting, etc. Last house I sold had some minor issues on inspection, one was the drip tube on the water heater T&P was too short, buyer wanted it fixed.
Pointless to mess around with this trivial stuff at that point in a sale. If I had it fixed or did it myself they would want to re-inspect, maybe work isn't to their standard, blah-blah-blah. I gave them $100 bucks off to hire their own plumber or go out to dinner. Getting hung up on hundreds of dollars when the sale is for tens of thousands doesn't make sense for anyone.
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based on a visual inspection and a few basic tests, if it a permit had been pulled or not (an exception would by a sign-off tag left by a inspector from whatever body issued a permit for that portion of the work).
But also, from a practical standpoint, if a HI sees what appears to be non-permitted work, that's a red flag that there may be other non-permitted DYI work present...I won't say the HI will be harder on the house, but they probably will be just bit a more careful and conservative during both the inspection and report writing - it's just a natural CYA reaction.
And one of the ways they may be more careful is to stress to the buyer that they might want go down to City Hall and check to see if permits were pulled for the work with observed defects - which can open a BIG can of worms if other non-permitted work has been done as well - even if that work was done by some owner previous to the seller, in many places it's ALL all going to be the seller's responsibility to correct.
Another issue is the situation where a HI performing a buyer's inspection suspects that significant defects are being deliberately hidden.
This is a judgment call - it's just human nature to hang a picture over a crack.
But when I'm standing in the basement, and the seller's wife suddenly appears with her chest hanging out of her blouse to make conversation, my first thought has GOT to be: "OK, where does she NOT want me to look? Humm, what's this steel shelving stuffed full of stuff doing all by itself against that wall by the corner of that window.... think I'll get out the inspection mirror and the flashlight... man, that's one BIG crack in that foundation wall back there ...".
In that situation the HI pretty much has to go into self defense mode - think as though they are in pre-litigation territory and ask themselves "what to I need to do protect myself if I find that two or three years hence I'm on the witness stand explaining what I did and didn't find here today" - and take as much time as necessary - and then some - to inspect extra throughly for hidden defects, and then report *every* defect they find, however minor, as well as every clue to possible problems in areas they were not able to inspect.
And while I try to write every report dispassionately and to the same standards, spending an extra half hour in a wet crawl space or a 140F attic looking for clues that someone is hiding something, and then spending extra hours trying to write an absolutely attorney-proof report, does not improve anyone's state of mind - I've met inspectors who "write hard" and "stick it to the SOB" in this situtation.
So IMO when preparing to put you home on the market it's wise to try to put yourself in the buyer's HI shoes, either by getting a prelisting inspection so you know what major issues will turn up on the HI's report, or at least inventorying the major issues you are aware of.
That way you will be prepared to resolve them during negotiators with a potential buyer - for example by having a few quotes in hand to replace an elderly roof - so you are not negotiating blind, or scrambling to get a handle on such costs..
Michael Thomas Paragon Home Inspection, LLC Chicago, IL mdtATparagoninspectsDOTcom 847-475-568
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MDT at Paragon Home Inspections, LLC wrote:

You inspectors get all the girls...
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On 17 Jul 2006 11:12:27 -0700, "MDT at Paragon Home Inspections, LLC"

Go Oprah.........
Oren
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I suggest you check with your local government about their procedures when a home is sold. Within 20 miles of my home, some towns require a pre sale inspection by the town inspector; some provide it (with a charge) if you request it, and some require no inspection at all. Depending on what your town does, you can make an informed decision.
I'm curious about your statement that you tried to meet code; my experience is that almost anyone can do an installation, but few, other than electricians, know what the actual code requirements are.
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

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On Mon, 17 Jul 2006 14:59:24 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Good in that you are considering the question. Bad in that you didn't include the jurisdiction that applies to you. Almost 100 percent of the logic comes from the jurisdiction..
If you lived in El Paso, Texas, then I'd consider you a complete and total fool for even thinking about code. Sure they have codes. Would a sale generate a search of government permits for everything in the house - Absolutey not.
If you lived in Boston, then maybe you should consider that it might be cheaper to take everything out.
Sell your house 'as-is' and disclose those things that are major such as termite damage, etc.
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JimL wrote:

I'm not sure I'd consider selling a home these days without the "as-is" qualifier no matter how perfect it was.
Pete C.
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I have heard of a few instances from my customers where they were asked to provide permit information for work that the previous owners had done. After being in that situation they now know to ask for permits when getting any work done themselves and also when buying a house they would want to know if permits were issued. This is in New Jersey and it seems to becoming more and more prevalent.
I suggest that you contact your building department and ask them what the permit requirements are for the work that you did. If they are required ask about getting one after the fact and get an inspection now. It always good to have these things done for your insurance company, and mortgage holder as well.
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A couple comments selling as is will cost the seller big bucks, since the buyer will suspect some big hidden troubles....
as is or not fixing minor DIY stuff?
90% of buyers today want a home in move in condition. they dont want to deal with remodeling or repairing at a time when they are probably strapped out buying the most expensive home they can afford:(
When attempting to sell something elminating 90% of your potential buyers isnt a good idea.....
best to find out whats wrong with your home and fiox all the minor cheap items
the too short T&P line may mean to some potential buyers a slip shod owner who may have done other hidden work on the cheap....
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