Sagging Door (was "How difficult to "build" a Door") III

Page 6 of 6  
dpb wrote:

I love it when I'm right :)
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Puddin' Man wrote:

The joint isn't "warped". It is offset because you didn't put the pieces together evenly. When they are, there won't be any - none, zero, nada - lateral pressure across the joint.
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Puddin' Man wrote:

Have you already glued stuff together? Are the stile and rail tight together on the other side (they are not on the photo side). If not glued together, you can (should be able to) fix it by clamping to pull the two pieces together; i.e, clamp pad high on the hinge stile, lower on lock stile. It probably got the way it is because you racked it when clamping.
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That's what I was wondering too. Is that piece really warped? Or is it how it's joining that's creating a tilt? If it's the latter with maybe some shims put in and correctly clamping it, it would seem to me he could get it back to being straight.
And like you say, hope he hasn't glued it.
But there are other unknowns here too. Like the condtion of the wood in question. Only so much you can tell from pics....
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On 7/20/2012 10:03 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

No clamps in sight altho he may have used one to pull it in initially.
Pretty clearly imo it's just hanging there because the dowels aren't fully tight in the holes--he's indicated that because of his inexperience in doing such stuff he's been reluctant to just dive in and do a widespread replacement to date so he's just pushed it back together as it came apart without yet doing the rest of the necessary restoration work to get a solid joint.
The worrisome part isn't that it isn't in line at this point (and it isn't a "warp" it's just loose and drooping; if he were to clamp it it would draw up into place against the opposing coping surfaces) it's that there's nothing at the present sufficiently tight to glue together.
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I agree with all of the above. Puddin is calling it a warp, but from the pics I agree with your assessment. If we were there, we'd just hold the bottom piece up, see that it isn't warped, just hanging, that it fits, then figure out if there is solid wood there and how to attach it securely, glue and clamp it square.
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On Wed, 18 Jul 2012 14:33:40 -0500, Puddin' Man

Gentle wiggling will get it apart. Don't use a pry bar. Use patience. I already mentioned reconditioning with boiled linseed oil. Here's something else I've done that works well. Don't oversize drill the dowel holes. Fill them with glued in dowel that fits as close as you can, but not oversized. Them redrill. You can use smaller dowels, and maybe add a couple. You said you have a dowel jig, so you can figure out what's best. Those old doors were "overbuilt." If you clean well, recondition, and glue well, it'll be as strong as the original. Just be patient, and it will come out well.
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Vic


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Puddin' Man wrote:

A. Take a stick. It needs to be...
1. Long enough 2. Wide and thick enough so it doesn't flop around. A 1x2 will work
B. Lay the stick across the two points you want to measure and mark their positions on the stick
C. Lay the stick across the other two points you want to measure. If the marks line up the two distances are equal.
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Simple enough.
What if there's tons of stuff in the way of accurately marking? It's like the diagonal on the door is 86 1/8", but there's stuff in the way of marking the (32") width on the stick?
I know, I know. Make a second stick. Eh?
Thx, P
"Law Without Equity Is No Law At All. It Is A Form Of Jungle Rule."
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On 7/19/2012 4:43 PM, Puddin' Man wrote:

He's described the flat surface technique; see my earlier response upthread from when you first asked on the simpler way to use two for inside measurements like the diagonal or the inside width...surface obstacles aren't, then.
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I used a Stanley Carpenters Square (solid steel) to assess square on the RO. The hinges are in the way on 1 side and I didn't have time to remove them. It wasn't necessary anyway.
The opening is sufficiently square for this application.
The Stanley square is not square. It is 90 degrees plus/minus something like .0000001. Everything is relevant.
If you think I cannot assess "square" for this application, I have no idea what you are doing in this thread.
P
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"Law Without Equity Is No Law At All. It Is A Form Of Jungle Rule."
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