RYOBI battery comments ?????????

I have many tools with rechargable batteries.
The WORST I have bought to date has been the 12 volt Ryobi.
Anyone have bad experiences with this drill ?
No need to say throw it away and buy a Milwaukee, Dewalt, etc.
Only interested in comments on this maker and batteries and good or bad expereinces.
I dropped Makita in favor of Ryobi.
I've bought new B&D drills with 6 volt batteries from yard sales for $5 that are still going strong 5-8 years later.
TIA
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A friend has a Ryobi drill (not sure if its 9.6 or 12v) and its little over 1.5 years old. Apparrently he has to keep the battery on the charger all the time and it loses a charge in a day or so if removed from the charger. I have a 4 or 5 year old dewalt 9.6 that has been very well used and the batteries are only now starting to show their age (still, they only take 25 mins to charge, give more than enough work time for the 2nd battery to charge, and hold a charge for several months of storage). I can drive probably 40 screws before a recharge, but the milage varies. Of course replacement batteries for the dewalt are pegged around $70 CDN...
-Dan
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that
I've got a Ryobi 18v drill that came with two magic batteries. I bought the drill, charged both batteries then put the drill away in a box in my garage. Actually I forgot I had it until 13 months later and rediscovered it when cleaning out. Both batteries had good charges on them-- I used them for lots of drilling and screwing on a project I was then working on.
That was a few years ago-- and they still hold charges a long time..
Doc
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com.mado (Conase) wrote in message


Which Ryobi 12V? Both are variable speed, but one has a single-ratio gearbox while the other has a two-ratio gearbox and better bearings and maybe gears. But I believe the battery packs are the same for both.
I haven't noticed any differences in battery life when the charger is smart and shuts off the current at full charge, but many drills that use 9V or less don't have them, or they use a simple thermostat, and either is a rough way to treat batteries.
It's usually best to not keep the batteries on the charger continuously because even low-current overcharging can causes tiny conductive whiskers between the plates of the cells and drain them. This applies not only to cordless tools but to anything powered by batteries, including phones and vacuum cleaners. Another reason that cells overcharge is because some of them have developed reverse polarity, so the charger doesn't know when to shut off. The only way to prevent that is by occasionally measuring each cell (Ryobi and DeWalt packs unscrew) and individually trickle charge any cell that has reverse polarity (full charge not needed). Otherwise you can charge an entire pack for a week and still not fix reversed cells.
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Nicads should only be charged on a peak charger or the heat destroys the cells. Never leave a pack in a charger, unless a peak charger, and you are sure it isnt charging. Nicads are fully charged when voltage drops and heats starts to build as a result. Peak chargers read either temp, volt drop, or both. Nicads are not the same as Lead Acid in charging and storage. Nicads should be stored discharged , or 1.2 v per cell or just when your drill slowes, it will be discharged. Running a pack dead, over discharging , will kill it or reverse cell polarity. Lead acid boils electrolite when over charged, Nicads are Cooked when overcharged. Packs are best charged only once a day, to allow chemical stabilisation. Never charge a hot or unrested pack. I suspect Ryobi uses Sub C cells , not C a battery of less capacity. Unless you have a peak charger watch pack temps, warm is Overcharged, Any increase over room temp and the pack is peaked. I still use a 18 yr old pack, not much life left in it, but it didnt die prematurely. Tool makers charge Fully for battery replacement and its a high profit item, There instructions seem biased to not informing customers of correct procedures so they can rely on your future busiess. Until drils have volt meters and electronics that stop a drill at low voltage everyone will suffer shorter pack life. Most camcorders have this feature as battery life is advertised , as is key. Why not tool makers , Future profit.
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote in message

I've never heard of a peak charger. I've heard of trickle chargers, pulse chargers (gimmick, except maybe for alkalines), and chargers that detect temperature, rate of rise of temperature, voltage change, and even rate of voltage change but never a peak charger.
Some automatic fast chargers shut down completely at full charge, but others switch to a trickle rate and maintain it indefinitely, which isn't good for cells left on too long.
Nicads are not fully charged when the voltage drops and heat starts to build but only about 80-90% charged because nicad chemistry generates heat before full charge, unlike NiMH chemistry.
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A charger that detects temp rise or voltage drop than stops charging is a peak charger. As are the better line of , Mikita - dewalt- Milwaukee etc etc etc . Peak Chargers. And who ever told you Nicads are not fully charged at voltage drop and or a 3 f degree rise doesnt know shit about Nicads and is abusing them and giving bad info. Do some research and your cells will last alot longer. Ive been using the voltage drop method and have 20 yr old operational nicads and 18 yr old Mikita packs. Cook em, you Kill em.
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote in message

I thought that was just a charger with automatic shut-off.

That would include www.maxim-ic.com and www.linear.com , which produce battery charger chips. Their data sheets show the voltage and temperature curves for nicads and NiMHs and indicate that the start of voltage drop isn't quite full charge and the temperature rise is much higher near full charge, at least for fairly fast charging: www.maxim-ic.com/tarticle/images/E28Fig02.gif (C/2 rate shown).

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I've had a little Ryobi 3" trim saw for about 10 years, never had a problem with the 12-V batteries.

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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/RYOBI-battery-comments-503830-.htm dcgreer wrote:
I am an electrician. I use battery tools all day every day. Ryobi by far is the worst I have used. The batteries do not last and have no pwer to begin with. The drill itself is cheap and the chuck is awful. Hilti lithium ion is the best!!!! Dewalt and Milwaukee are good too. It really come down to... you get what you pay for.
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