Ruud AC Unit Not Cooling

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Hi folks!
No-nothing type here, trying not to get hoodwinked by the AC guys coming out tomorrow. Any help in understanding the issues at hand is much appreciated.
The unit is a RUUD Acheiver 10 "SCRO11 Inside" is what one of the labels says. We bought the house ten years ago, and the inspector said the unit was about 2 years old at that time. The house has 2200 square feet, well insulated, all finished.
Last year the thing stopped cooling. The fan blows fine, but it is just not very cool. We have NOT had the thing serviced yearly as the manufacturer suggests, but have been good about changing filters under the house.
We don't want to replace the system yet, if we can avoid it.
Do any of you have any experience that might help me know what to expect?
Thanks.
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aughghghgh! I meant "know-nothing."
Yes, I are leterate.
lol
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The blower motor runs and the Unit is fitted with a Copeland Scroll compressor. That is not enough information to diagnose a fault.

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Thanks. I was looking more for an array of possible problems/fixes. Questions like, if anyone had a similar unit of a similar age with similar problem, did coolant solve the problem, or did they have to replace it, that sort of thing.
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Our RUUD blows one of the fuses on the outside disconnect almost every year upon initial startup. Make sure they don't charge you an arm and a leg and just replace a fuse.
s

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Now this is helpful, thank you! When it blows a fuse, what happens? Does the fan stop running, or does it stop cooling, or what?
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the indoor fan still operates, but the outdoor (condensing unit) does not run and no cooling.
s

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If it does nothing see if it is getting power first.
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It does everything but cool! ;)
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I don't have experience yet, but I will on Thursday.
We had a guy come in a couple of weeks ago to clean the system. Well, he couldn't clean our closet AC unit (5000 ton) RUUD because it needs to be pulled out to be cleaned. He quoted $900+. Forget that.
Found a RUUD dealer. They'll charge $378 to pull and clean the evaporator coils. That's more like it.
If you've never had the inside coils (evaporator coils) cleaned, do it.
I suspect that's our problem here. I mean it works but it only cools the house 10 degrees, not 20 like we were used to. The other guy said that it has tons of dust and hair in it and mold (which I dare not tell the others in the house).
So perhaps with a good cleaning and getting a really THICK THICK filter for the intake (like 6-8 inches thick, instead of the little paper one that you get at the stores), it'll solve this problem.
I'll let you know. Pop me an email in a few days and remind me and I'll post my findings to the group.
Kenneth Udut of Naples, FL http://spock.com/Kenneth-Udut http://free.naplesplus.us
cybercat wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (Kenneth Udut of Naples, FL USA) wrote in

5000 ton...how many BTU's is that? Rooms in your house must be pretty big if a closet hosts that unit :-)
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Kenneth, thank you! I will email you to remind you.
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"cybercat" wrote

12 years old right? It may need coolant but I cant recall if thats just before they changed the type or not. If it predates the new stuff, you will want to check prices for replacement as you may not be able to get the old style much longer at all.
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can't add coolant to the new type?
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home units have changed refrigerants, (not coolant) but the old r-22 is still used and still available. Beware of misinformation.
s

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"S. Barker" wrote

My bad if i used the wrong term. Can you explain the difference between refigerant and coolant? All I know is in *my area* the old stuff is barely obtainable. My system though is far older than hers.
I am checking prices as sometime in the not too distant future, we will need to replace the AC portion. It's actually older than such units were rated for at the time.
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refrigerant is used in a/c systems. and is called things like r-12, r-22, r-134a, r-410 ect. sometimes wrongly called freon.
coolant is used in internal combustion engines to cool them. called things like antifreeze, ethelyene glycol, etc.
steve

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.

You must be outside the United States. R-22 can still be manufactured for new systems for two more years and the folks that make R-22 can continue to do so until 2020 to service older systems. I doubt R-22 will be hard to get anytime in the next 20 to 30 years though it may get pricey after 2020.
http://www.epa.gov/ozone/title6/phaseout/22phaseout.html Phaseout Schedule for HCFCs Including R-22 Under the terms of the Montreal Protocol, the U.S. agreed to meet certain obligations by specific dates that will affect the residential heat pump and air-conditioning industry:
January 1, 2004: In accordance with the terms of the Montreal Protocol, the amount of all HCFCs that can be produced nationwide must be reduced by 35% by 2004. In order to achieve this goal, the U.S. is ceasing production of HCFC-141b, the most ozone-damaging of this class of chemicals, on January 1, 2003. This production ban will greatly reduce nationwide use of HCFCs as a group, making it likely that the 2004 deadline will have a minimal effect on R-22 supplies. January 1, 2010: After 2010, chemical manufacturers may still produce R-22 to service existing equipment, but not for use in new equipment. As a result, heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) system manufacturers will only be able to use pre-existing supplies of R-22 to produce new air conditioners and heat pumps. These existing supplies would include R-22 recovered from existing equipment and recycled. January 1, 2020: Use of existing refrigerant, including refrigerant that has been recovered and recycled, will be allowed beyond 2020 to service existing systems, but chemical manufacturers will no longer be able to produce R-22 to service existing air conditioners and heat pumps. For more information about this phaseout, see fact sheets about the HCFC Phaseout Schedule and Frequently Asked Questions on the HCFC Phaseout.
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"cybercat" wrote

Not exactly. It's that you can't add the new coolant to the old type machines. Freon and some shift. I am sorry that i can't recall the dates of the shift but if they tell you to replace the unit as it has older coolant type, I'd start checking prices right away.
Here's the upside of that *if* it comes to that. Check energystar ratings. If you get a unit that is so rated, your electrical bills will be less in summer and you can file it as an energy improvement on the following year's taxes. You dont get a total write off for the cost on adding such an 'upgrade' but a portion of it comes back so you may get as much as 20% of the cost back? Will depend on your circumstances and wages etc.
Now, sometimes they can adapt a unit built for the older coolant, but it seldom works as well as intended or as well as one built for the new stuff. It also can (sometimes) cost as much as 50% of the price of a new unit to adapt an old one. When you think about the lifecycle of an AC system and your's being 12 years (12 right?) this may not be a very good deal financially.
Now lets take best and worst case at same time. Older coolant but you guy can supply it. If you do not have a true leak, go for it as you'll be good a few more years. Check prices of new units but wait as they are getting more and more efficient as we typo to one another.
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Ahh, I see.

I will do that.

We want a new unit, there are just other things I would like to do with the house fund at the moment.

Yes, this is what we want to do. Just do what it takes to get another year or two out of this one, give us time to do the research and such.
Thanks so much. I will report on the outcome after the guys come tomorrow.
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