running a straight line through trees

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Running a line between two end points that are equally offset from the corners should work fine. Just measure back the offset amount anywhere along the line to get the actual boundary. I have done it a number of times and come within a couple of inches of where subsequent surveys showed the boundary to be.
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On Nov 19, 9:34 pm, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

What? You think it needs to 'see' the satellites?
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On Sun, 22 Nov 2009 09:09:43 -0800 (PST), Robatoy

As a matter of fact, it does need a clear shot. The signal from the GPS satellites is not very strong, and leaves on trees is often enough to disrupt communication with a GPS receiver. Heck, even satellite TV dishes have trouble with leaves between them and the satellites they use.
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On Sun, 22 Nov 2009 13:43:15 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

I have 2 GPSs that work great on my boat but are virtually useless in the woods for this exact reason.
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On Thu, 19 Nov 2009 15:42:37 -0600, Jules

Run a line parallel to the existing markers but outside the wooded area. Then from any point you like on the reference line, measure perpendicular into the woods the same length as the offset of the outside line from the end markers.
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On Thu, 19 Nov 2009 17:19:25 -0500, salty wrote:

Aha - yes, that's a good plan. There are really too many buildings on our side of the line to do that, but I can do it from the vacant plot (the folk who own it currently are good enough that I know they won't mind)
cheers
Jules
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Since the lot next door isn't wooded, that's your solution.
I once worked for a survey company for a few days (a long time ago) and my job was to cut "sight lines" through a wooded lot that was going to be surveyed. It was no fun -- mostly just hacking away brush and small trees to be able to see from one end of the lot to the other. It involved multiple sight lines because the survey had to also show the elevation of the land on the interior section. I guess there were no other magic tricks the surveyor could do so he had to pay us to chop sight lines all day long for a few days. We were doing it in the middle of a hot summer.
If you do end up having to chop any sight lines, it will be a lot easier if you can wait until winter after all of the leaves have fallen off the trees.
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On Thu, 19 Nov 2009 21:32:44 -0500, JayB wrote:

Well, the wooded area does extend maybe 100' into the next-door lot, but that's not too bad I think. I suspect if I do that to get my line close (it might wobble a bit) I can straighten it up once it's 'drawn'.

Uh huh. Of course if I were to put a fence through I'd need to do some chopping anyway :-) But I'll hold off on the fence as it depends who buys the lot (which may end up being us anyway) and it seems a shame to clear a path if it's not needed. Our dogs sometimes wander onto that lot though which is the only reason I might decide to fence it.
cheers
Jules
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wrote:

Kill two birds...
Save some money and figure out your lot line at the same time:
Just buy the wooded area that extends into the next lot.
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on 11/19/2009 5:19 PM (ET) snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote the following:

That's what I did. A straight line from one marker to the other was blocked by trees between the two, so I measured ten feet away from the each marker into my property and stuck a temporary stake into the ground at each point, then strung a line from one new stake to the other (300 feet away). I could then mark off divisions in the property line along its length by measuring ten feet from the new line to the actual property line.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Jules wrote:

I did a fairly good job finding my lines using an "engineers compass" and a plot plan. The "engineers compass" is like a tiny cheap hand held version of a transit, but worse, it came from WalMart. Very very basic. Wait for all the leaves to fall. I went to the one and only corner marker I could find and using the compass turned the plat map so North is North. Aimed the compass site using the compass markings and lining it up with the line on my map. Sighted through a tiny lens and a single cross hair as far as the next tree it hit. Walked to that tree and did it again. Kept doing that until I found the other corner markers, and in 600 or so feet I was off by 6 feet. Sure that's a lot for some things but I just wanted an idea of were the corner of my property was, and there it was, well marked.
Turns out the other land owner had some pro's come through a couple months later. He showed me one place I had marked, about half way between corners, I was off by only 6 inches there and he acted like that was a lot. Only reason I ended up 6 feet off in the end was due to the terrain. A lot of it was literally stretching and climbing up the mountain a couple feet at a time and getting myself on the uphill side of the next tree to rest against. I accidentally rode down the mountain on my ass with a shit load of leaves under me and in front of my feet. It was kind of fun.
As far as markers, they use an ax and take off the topmost part of the bark, it didn't get down to fresh wood. Then those spots were painted blue. Some with 4 blue lines like a square, some just 1 or 2 marks. I'm guessing the marks meant something that had to do with were the exact property line was... in front or in back of the tree.
There was one spot where I am close to the property line and they marked it with the 4 blue marks and a small yellow no trespassing sign in the middle. It seemed to stick out like a sore thumb and from the driveway it drew your attention. So I mixed up some mud, real mud, dirt and water, and plastered over the blue marks. And I got a few large leaves to stick on the nail holding the little sign. Now I don't see it, but it's still easy to find if you are close and looking for it.
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wrote:

How tall is the tallest tree between the markers?
The products shown here range from 18 feet (Sale Price: $6,050) to 41 feet (Sale Price: $28,315).
http://www.artificialplantsandtrees.com/Trees/Big_Trees/big_trees.html
Buy 2 that are just higher than the tallest existing tree, tie a string to the top of each one and stand them up right next to the markers..
QED
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-------------------------------------------------------
We were trained how to do something like that with a compass during basic training many years ago.
Perhaps you can find a new soldier who has recently had that training to help with your project.
Freckles
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The only thing comes to mind to me. Use a high power laser, and burn through the trees and leaves. There should be enough visible burn damage to follow with the string.
No, I don't have a high power laser listed on Ebay for such a purpose.
I doubt this is workable, but it's fun to imagine.
--
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well the buyer will normally have to get their purchase surveyed. you might be able to get their surveyor to stake the line for a few extra bucks,,
espically if you are planning on a fence
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Clear a path using a machete to remove brush and small limbs even small trees. Hopefully you will be able to see through. If not offsetting a small amount to the side will sometimes allow you to see. Put something on the far end that is large and highly visible.
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your property, with the survey points marked. As government property it is available to the public. If the photo was taken when the ground was visible beneath the trees you may be able pick out enough points along the property line to get a rather precise set of ground points.
It's possible that you can locate the corners yourself by zooming in on Google maps -- I just checked it out and can on my house -- even though there are a lot of trees blocking the view I can still pick out enough landmarks to be able to draw a property line.
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On Thu, 19 Nov 2009 20:58:20 -0500, JimR wrote:

Interesting - didn't know that, and I think I'd quite like to get a copy anyway (whether it's useful or not), particularly if it's something that might be a few years old (we're on the central lot of what was once a farm, so have lots of farm buildings - but there were various ones that were pulled down before we moved in, so it'd be interesting to see an overhead view of the place before that happened)
I guess as the boundaries don't change they don't retake photos that often.

No joy there unfortunately - we're pretty much out in the wilds so it's an area where they haven't done high-res data yet. I'm kind of hoping they don't until after I re-roof the barn, then I can leave them a nice message on the top ;)
cheers
Jules
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clipped

I looked up some directions the other day on Google. I normally use mapquest, so Google dir. was new to me. I clicked on one of the camera icons, out of curiosity, and....lo and behold...there I was, the day I worked on putting some Bondo on the old Buick in front of the house :o)
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