Rules on Asbestos

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On 10/22/2012 11:08 PM, bob haller wrote: ...

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There has to _be_ a problem first and there isn't/wasn't any problem here except the one you dreamed up out of your apparently inflated fearful imagination or from you desire to spread FUD and mostly _dis_information.
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On 10/21/2012 9:48 PM, bob haller wrote:

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Well, again, you've taken a basic tenet and turned it into a tale of unmitigated woe, Haller...
The risks (and therefore mitigation requirements and need for licensed contractors, etc.) are _HIGHLY_ dependent upon the form in which the asbestos is present. The risk from asbestos exposure is virtually all in the friable, airborne particles that come from such applications as the insulation products or the very fine dust that accumulated from, say, brake linings that were airborne when using an air gun to clean drums during replacements.
Vinyl/asbestos floor tile and the like are essentially non-friable products and have very little dust-making propensity even when broken in removal unless one goes out of one's way to create such dust.
So, while it probably is worthwhile to note the tiles were removed, it surely isn't anything at all likely that any future buyer has any real actionable cause even if not assuming even a modicum of care and cleanup was taken in their removal. The chances of any inspection uncovering asbestos in a friable, dangerous condition would be near zero unless the tiles were deliberately ground to a powder and spread around. You might as well claim they need to rewire and replace every panel box on general principles, too.
<http://www.hse.gov.uk/asbestos/licensing/asbestos-work-categories.pdf>
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It's a big IF as to whether a state would require it to be disclosed at time of sale. AFAIK, in most places it's legal for a homeowner to remove their own floor tile that contains asbestos. I can show you states that outline the procedure, etc. Assuming you do it and follow the guidelines, unless the state you happen to be living in specifically requires disclosure of such removal when you go to sell, then you have nothing to disclose. There may be some states that do require it to be disclosed, but I don't believe it's the general case.

$$$ out of what account? They can't access any accounts you have unless they sue you, win and you don't pay. And when suing, they have some substantial burdens to overcome. And even after that, they have to prove actual damages as a result.

They can't demand a pro clean-up if there is no law that says a homeowner can't do it themselves, there is no contamination, etc. Now if they do testing and find contamination, then they have grounds to proceed.
and environmental tests, imagine if

Having a bad sewer line that you know about and fail to disclose is an entirely different ballgame. In that case, there is an existing problem. In the case of the tile, if you are permitted to remove it yourself, do so, and are unaware of any problem, then you have no existing problem.
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hmmm...Isn't... Bermuda Triangle an example of "selective memory"? UFO's exist, appear in scripture.? Salem Witches was an example of greed, a "land grab' scheme?
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Having scraped up a tile floor in the 60's, that looks like a great tool! Thanks.
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Dick Adams wrote:

Even cheaper is a scraper blade for your reciprocating saw, about ten bucks. It's available at the box store and can be re-sharpened.
Here's a bucket-load of them; http://www.google.com/search?q=reciprocating+saw+scraper+blade&rls=com.microsoft:en-us:IE-SearchBox&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&sourceid=ie7&rlz=1I7GGLL_en#q=reciprocating+saw+scraper+blade&hl=en&rls=com.microsoft:en-us:IE-SearchBox&rlz=1I7GGLL_en&prmd=imvns&source=univ&tbm=shop&tbo=u&sa=X&ei=ZeuDUK7UI-iU2AX9mIGABg&ved EIQsxg&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.&fp047ec0a7d049ad&bpcl5466521&biw21&bihG3
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On 10/20/2012 9:09 PM, Dick Adams wrote:

But is it legal for a DIY asbestos tile removal project? All the publications I've read on it say that such tile may only be removed using manual tools. Power tools are not allowed. This one in particular looks iffy because it uses air, and you don't want to be blowing asbestos-laced dust about.
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Dick be aware of; that some communities have very strict laws about any material that has asbestos in it, before you start removal job fines can be very high get some information how to get read of tiles first.

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Grumpy wrote:

On the other hand, if you call attention to yourself - by inquiring or requesting a permit - you will come under scrutiny by your betters.
No, best to dig up the tiles, put them in a trash bag, and leave them in a schoolyard during the dark of the moon. Tell no one.
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wrote:

Just deliver them to your local dump along with other household garbage - well bagged.
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That is exactly what I would do. It is an accepted method and legal.
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It came from the ground. Put it back where it came from.
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