rubber strip hole cutting tool

anyone know of a tool that would cut a round hole on a rubber strip?
Its for a truck car-flag bed rail project I'm working on.
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wrote:

How big a hole & how thick a rubber strip?
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On 2/18/2011 10:31 PM, Red wrote:

I don't have the actual size of the hole, but its the usual 5"x5" L or T brace with pre-drilled holes that home depot sells. the strip is 2"W x 36"L x 1/8" thick and haven't cut to desired length which is 1"W x 5"L. (i'm wondering how I'm gonna cut it nice and even, prolly with a sharp knive and ruler I suppose).
Is gorilla glue sufficient for bonding rubber to metal?
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wrote:

NO. Use CA glue (cyanoacrylate, Crazy Glue, whatever). Often used to make o-rings by bonding cut ends of extruded round strips together.
Joe
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On 2/19/2011 12:07 PM, Joe wrote:

ok, thanx for the tip. I got the rubber strip cut to the length I need. now I need glue. :)
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On 2/19/2011 12:07 PM, Joe wrote:

is this the super glue you're refering to? http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1v/R-100401767/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId051&catalogId053
will spray adhesive do?
http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1v/R-100174709/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId051&catalogId053 http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1v/R-100151277/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId051&catalogId053
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On 2/18/2011 10:31 PM, Red wrote:

this is the 2 braces I'm testing. I've noticed that the hole sizes are different between the 2 braces.
L-brace http://www.s10planet.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid 398&d92824309
Home Depot was out L-brace, so, I wasn't able to measure it other than the one I had at home.
minimum hole appears to be 1/4" or 6mm, the counter sunk holes appear to be smaller than 5/16" or approximately 7mm as its bigger than 6mm and smaller than 8mm. the #10-24 x 1/2" machine screw flat head is a little too big. not sure what flat head machine screw will fit in there. I guess I could make the counter sink hole a bit bigger. I understand that there are counter-sink bits for certain types of jobs.
T-brace http://www.s10planet.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid 399&d92824465
the minimum hole size fits a 1/4" or M7 machine screw , the counter sunk hole is about 5/16", didn't check metric on that one.
M7 is actually the better fit as I could screw in the sample bolts. Unforgettably, I couldn't find any M7 machine screw to compare with the 1/4" machine screw at Home Depot. 1/4" screw (I forget what type screw it was) turned out to be a little too big, I tried #10-24 x 1/2" machine screw, its flat head fit better.
sigh, I found a bad screw in a pack of 8 screw/nuts; its threads are stripped. 7.5 out of 8 ain't too bad. :) is it possible to debur this or just a waste of time.
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?

They are typically cut with a punch. What size do you need? A shoe repair or leather shop may be able to do it for you.
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On Fri, 18 Feb 2011 22:27:58 -0600, dilbert firestorm

Use a round tube of the desired diameter. Chamfer the inside or outside diameter (your choice) so the remaining material forms a sharp edge. Place the tube with the sharp edge on the rubber strip. Use a BFH to smack the unmodified end of the tube, not your hand, and your done.
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wrote:

Laboratory workers for years have used sharpened brass tubing sets for drilling holes in rubber stoppers. The best lubricant for this job is plain water. Any thin rigid tubing will work on rubber, like a piece of 3/8" hydraulic (brake) line, whatever. A regular drill or similar is hopeless. G. Shumway has it right.
Joe
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Actually, glycerine is even better than water.
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dilbert firestorm wrote:

the drip system section in home depot has a hole cutting implement used for punching holes in the tubing that is about the right size.
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On 2/22/2011 6:16 PM, chaniarts wrote:

is this the one you're refering to? http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1v/R-100130448/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId051&catalogId053
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dilbert firestorm wrote:

http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1v/R-100130448/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId051&catalogId053
one of many, but yes.
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