Rough cost to insulate walls post-construction


I live in the Midwest US and this may be the first of a few questions this week as I remodel the bathroom.
While ripping out the crooked, old, decrepit, pink ceramic wall tile in my bathroom I found the source for my heating-bill woes. There's hardly any insulation in the exterior walls (ceilings are more or less ok). This is a job I would hire out. I'd like to know for the purpose of planning my finances, whether this is a $1500 job or a $5000 job, just a ballpark guess, but there's a twist that worries me.
The house is a 50 year old ranch with full brick exterior walls, and the exposed badly-insluated perimiter is about 130 feet. I'm assuming a contractor would drill holes and blow something in to fill the cavity. This is where the details get a bit excruciating and I hope this makes sense.
The walls, starting outside and working in, are
- a layer of traditional red brick - a layer of some fiber-board stuff about half an inch thick - about an inch of air - a layer of insulation literally one inch thick [fiberglass with an interior backing layer that is silver] - about 1.5" of air - sheetrock.
The twist to this is that the one-inch-thick insulation was made to be stapled up in such a way as to leave a pocket of air on either side of it - basically if you're looking down from above it's a thin insulating layer in the middle of the air pocket between the studs.
Each 'X' in the picture shown, taken from above, is a stud, the hyphens mark the insulation layer:
X---------------X---------------X---------------X---------------X---------------X
Can blown-in insulation be done so as to fill up both air gaps - the one closes to the bricks as well as the one behind the thin layer of fiberflass ?
Thank you !
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:
I live in a similar style house in the mid-west. Based on the information supplied by out local electric company website (below) I decided to ignore the walls and spend more on insulating the ATTIC, DOOR SEALS, WINDOWS SEALS, and spaces between the RAFTERS in the basement. I will let you know next spring as to the results :) These are things you can do yourself (on your own time-table).
I am not ready to have people drill holes in the wall, plaster the holes and repaint every room.
"What is the R-Factor?
The R-Factor is an insulating material's resistance to heat transfer. The thicker the insulation, the higher the R-Factor, the more energy efficient the application.
The R-Factor value you need depends on where you live, your utility rates and your existing insulation. In general, use R-30 for attics; R-13 for walls and R-19 over ventilated floor spaces and crawl spaces. Most labels list the R-Factor on the bag or batt along with the number of bags or batts required per 1,000 square feet of attic floor area, the number of square feet covered per bag and the thickness you should have upon job completion. Where to Insulate
Your attic, walls, basement and switch plates on exterior walls are four key areas to insulate. Areas not heated or cooled should also be insulated.
Attics-The average home loses 33 percent of its heat through the attic. Save up to 15 percent on your heating and cooling costs by insulating to R-30 or better.
Walls-Walls account for up to 27 percent of the heat loss in the average home. Insulate to R-13 or better and save up to 14 percent on your energy bills.
Basements-Install better insulation between your floor joists or place R-19 over unheated/uncooled areas and save up to 13 percent on your heating and cooling costs."
best Kent
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Interesting. I have 1 inch of fiberglass insulatio in the walls, and several inche sin the attic. Last January my gas bill was $400. I also have 1949-era single-pane aluminum windows. I think covering the windows will help but my real probelm (sicne I have no basement - just a slab) is the walls.
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I think you need to make an energy/insulation plan IF your planning to stay in that house for any considerable period of time. It is not only time intensive but costly to correct all of your issues. Even so, if your going to live there 5+ years you can easily get your money back and then some with the updates. Energy is only going to get more expensive as the years go by.
For example: First bring attic insulation up to R30 Replace leaking windows OR buy storm windows. (Personally the windows work best.) Make sure there are no leaks/holes in the house (I found three serious leaks in my home inspection and sealed them with inexpensive thermal expanding foam) Investigate wall expanding foam options: http://www.tigerfoam.com / (this I have not done yet.) The Walls would be my last choice. You might see if your electric company offers a "thermal" inspection. They use a special camera which shows your energy leaks.
best
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On 10 Oct 2006 19:32:04 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Get someone to take an infared picture of the house, and insulate wherever you're loosing the most heat, first.
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I found this site and it sounds almost too good to be true but.....might be worth researching.
http://www.insuladd.com/index.htm
Sounds like an inexpensive way to deal with your walls?/house?
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

X---------------X---------------X---------------X---------------X---------------X
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