rope question

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Steve B wrote:

Nylon webbing. I used abandoned truck strap around a big cottonwood and a old climbing rope to hold up a fallen apple tree for the last ten years.
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On 7/24/2010 10:29 AM, cj wrote:

Parachute cord, lasts forever & is strong.
MikeB
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The answer: None. But you can buy some aircraft cable that has green covering. You may have to look a bit. All rope of any type will weather out, untwist, stretch, or do something, and then one day just fall off. If you want to change it every couple of years, just use rope. The best for outside is called sisal, as it does not swell up and absorb as much water as manila. Not as pretty as colored synthetic. There are all kinds of synthetics, but I would suggest Polypropylene, as it does well outside. Sunshine is the biggest killer. If you can find something labeled UV resistant, that would be the best choice.
And if you do use colored synthetic, you will have to finish off the ends. This can be as simple as burning them until they melt with a match, or backsplicing and end splicing them professionally. You can even get clamps, or seize them (wrap them round and round) with small twine, but that doesn't weather very well, either. You want to finish the ends so they don't unlay and frazzle and look bad.
Hang a small weight on a string about two or three feet long under your birdhouse to keep it from swaying as much in the wind, and to help it stop once it starts swaying. As one person suggested, you might want to anchor them to something solid. I got a dead pecan limb that was pretty substantial, and mounted a bunch of different ones on there, so it gives a perch and a strong support, and looks cool, too. Whatever fits with your decor.
Steve
visit my blog at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com
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On Sat, 24 Jul 2010 09:40:37 -0700, "Steve B"

+1 on the aircraft cable. The big box store ought to carry it and all the pulleys, connectors, etc you need. If your doesn't, any decent hardware store will.
There is a crimper for the button stops, but I've had good luck with vice grips.
Jim
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cj wrote:

Rope choices...
1. Polypropylene: comes in colors, floats, is junk
2. Hemp (manila): nice brown color, not particularly strong, cheap, gets prickly as it ages
3. Nylon: very strong, stretches, not good with UV light
4. Dacron: also strong, little stretch, handles UV much better than nylon.
5. Cotton: rots
If you have to have rope, get dacron. Three strand twist is fine, cheaper than braided. With any of the synthetics, burn the end to keep it from unraveling. That or whip, rose and crown or other end knot; hemp needs one of the latter.
--

dadiOH
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We had clothes line that was steel multi strand that had green plastic covering so no rust. Won't stretch and will hold weight. Held up in sunlight. WW
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Chris... Found at Amazon 100 feet $5 Green. Search as > plastic covered clothesline green< WW
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WW wrote:

i went to my local military surplus place and they have what appears to be 3/16 para cord in the color i want, .10 a foot and the guy says that if it breaks he'll replace it
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I have a feeder on a pole with phone line about 6ft above it, I thought I knew how smart squirrels were until one that couldnt get up my feeder, or jump down on it from the telephone wire without hitting the slippery feeder roof, tried to fall onto the feeder by eating through my telephone line. Luckily I saw what he was doing and moved the pole before he ate through my phone line. A cable with weight on a tree will over time cause it harm by stopping its growth where it is forced on the tree. Damage will occur slowly, and a bolt will eventualy rust and leave a hole. My neighbor has killed the top of her tree with a cable. You need something wide to distribute the cables weight. A pole is usualy best for a feeder
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Suggest you use your eyebolts. Tie rope to one & pass through the other to a weight. This is an easy way to keep the rope tight even if it stretches as it ages. Also, you can just pull the feeder down to service it. When done, simply let it return to its normal height. No tying/untying knots, etc.
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wrote:

Damn fine suggestion. I would have not thought of that.
Steve
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We're all sharing things here on feeders and such. I saw this on TV about NASA. But with a twist. They were describing how they would stop things in space when they would oscillate beyond control. They had a tube that had balls on it, and springs at the end of the tubes so that when something spun, the balls went to the end, made a thunk, and took some of the oscillation and dampened it. Over a short time, the oscillation was dampened, and in a very short time. They then showed the real time on earth application, and that was to hang a weight under something that was say, swinging in the wind wildly, and the feeder/whatever would go one way, swinging the weight the other, each swing reducing the action by half. In a very short time, the weight will stop the feeder/whatever from swinging. Or at least when it is windy, cause it not to swing so violently. Try it. It really works. Really. Really good. Use a cord for the weight that is at least as long, or longer than the tethering cord to the feeder/whatever. Watch it work. It is intriguing.
Yer welcome. Well, it's from your tax dollars and NASA.
Steve
visit my blog at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com
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On 7/24/2010 11:33 PM, Steve B wrote:

Have you seen the huge weights used to stabilize skyscrapers? It's amazing to watch those things move back and forth when a big wind whips up.
TDD
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On 7/24/2010 9:29 AM, cj wrote:

You could use green vinyl covered wire rope like that used for clothes lines and attach it to screw eyes screwed into the tree. It is flexible enough to work with pulleys to raise and lower it. I'd have some fun with the squirrels by sliding lengths of green painted PVC pipe over the wire so the critters would roll off when trying to walk the wire to get to the bird feed.
TDD
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I have a black rope with some red. I think it is called a truckers rope. It has been outdoors for the 20 years that I have had it and it is still in pretty good shape. It was old when I got it off the side of the road. I have some white nylon rope that has been outdoors for 20 years also that is still in great shape.

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Black/red is polypropylene. Lasts a long time.
Steve
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I use 20# test fish line for my hummingbird feeder. Replace the line every 12 months.
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