rope question

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greetings, i would like to hang a bird feeder between 2 mature tree's (about 50 feet)and i need suggestions on a type of rope that can be stretched rather tight, hold up to the elements( UV, ice, snow) and not sag too much as the bird feeder is a larger type and once full will be rather heavy( maybe 10 pounds). also, i would prefer a rope that is green in color as to blend in with the surrounding trees thanks, chris
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cj wrote:

If you plan to tie this rope around the trees, you are likely to damage or kill the trees. Why not a post?
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Drill, then put a screw eye into a larger branch of each tree. Will do minimal damage, that way.
Harbor Freight has some rope that's green, comes in 100 foot pieces, and cheap enough.
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If you want green, the choice is rather limited to synthetics. Putting a rope around the tree long term can cause damage to the trees or at least result in ugly growth. It is also a nice easy path for squirrels to travel to the feeder. Why not consider a pole and guard system?
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

i am planning to screw eyebolts into the tree one will anchor the rope and the other as a pulley so as to raise and lower the feeder for filling. the bird feeder will be strung up at least 20 above the ground and since it centered between the two tree's the squirrels will have to navigate a rather wobbly tight rope to get to the feeder. the feeder is designed to close the seed holes when a squirrel is on one of the perches. ( i already have one and it works as advertised...) can you recommend a good synthetic rope? thanks
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What's the point?

I assure you that won't bother the squirrels _at all_.

Just put it on a post.
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GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

-snip-
Agree-- the only thing that will stop the squirrels is a baffle like this- http://www.bird-house-bath.com/d/Hanging-Baffle-Extra-Large.php
In order to work the baffle must be larger than the feeder.
And then only if the feeder isn't within 5 feet of a tree or building that they can access-- 10 feet if they can get some elevation on it.
Jim [oh- BTW-- If you have any squirrels at all forget about using rope. Aircraft cable is the *only* way to get your tightrope to last more than a year. Squirrels love chewing on anything people have touched]
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Jim Elbrecht wrote:

i have three baffles on my other feeder and they dont work. i have watched them get around whilst clutching with their little squirrel hands, feet and tail. once they are on the feeder their weight closes the seed openings...everytime
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So put the damn thing on a post already. Why is it important to suspend it 20 feet in the air? If the squirrels can't get to the seed anyway, what difference does it make *where* the feeder is?
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A couple of things.
If these are fairly large trees, be careful of stretching the rope too tight. When a stiff gust causes the trees to sway in opposite directions a tremendous amount of force may be applied to the rope (enough to snap just about anything if it doesn't stretch enough).
Traversing 20 feet of wobbly rope won't slow a 3-legged squirrel down much (they may try to balance on top at first, but if that fails they will just cross it upside down). If the trick openings are working, that sounds like the only thing that will matter. I'd be very surprised if hanging it between trees will change anything.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJ8mclTumLQ

And of course, if all else fails, they'll probably just chew through the rope...
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Larry Fishel wrote:

My mom had a bird feeder on a post and she used to smear Crisco on the post so's the squirrels could not climb it :o)
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That was great. Thanks for posting. I have a bird feeder on a post. Sits at about 5 feet high. When I first put it up they tried and tried to jump on it from a trellis about 4 ft away. They had to make a perfect landing to get to the food which was almost impossible. They tried and tried but I don't think they ever made it. Sure was fun to watch. Prior to this we tried all sorts of feeders that the squirrels would figure out. They are remarkably crafty critters. :-)
Mine looks like this but I have it attached to a metal pole. Only small birds fit on the perch. The largest birds we get are cardinals. The thing is about these feeders is, even if the squirrel gets on top they can't get to the perch. They just fall off. Watching them try can be entertaining for hours. If they did manage to get a meal they deserve it.
http://barninthesticks.com/contents/media/hs3201s.jpg
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Neatest thing I saw was a trapper friend of mine did. He took two equal lengths of parachute cord, and made two snares. He tied them off at exactly the same spot on the branch. When two squirrels got snared, they would fall and smack together repeatedly, and just chew the living crap out of each other until they died, or one got away.
Steve
visit my blog at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com
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On 7/24/2010 4:31 PM, Steve B wrote:

So when collected, the squirrels were already tenderized?
TDD
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<<What's the point?>>
looks cool, plus the birds can hang out on the line
<<I assure you that won't bother the squirrels _at all_.>>
it's fun to see them work hard to reach the feeder and then be denied any reward. i usually throw a couple of handfulls on the ground for the ground feeding birds, chipmunks and squirrels
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I like to hang a rat trap from the bottom of a feeder until it is just reachable by a squirrel. They will work harder when reaching upward, and when they reach the trigger, they are usually fully extended, and death is instant. You do have to use larger wire to keep the trap from twisting as much, or a pole like an old broom stick. But that's only if you want to get rid of the squirrels.
Steve
visit my blog at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com

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Look for ANYTHING that is braided. That means you can see an interwoven pattern on the outside. If you get plaited (wound in a spiral), it will unlay, stretch, and just generally be a pita. As someone mentioned, parachute cord is good and cheap. 1/8" diameter, and STRONG! IIRC, Sportsman Supply, or something like that has military cord in rolls for cheap. Google military surplus parachute cord. This cord should be good for a couple of seasons. Burn the ends after cutting so it doesn't fray back. Easy stuff to work with, and the absolute best your tax dollars can buy. You can't get stuff that is anywhere this good at the Big Box stores.
Steve
visit my blog at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com
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There is a style of clothseline that is made from a small diameter steel cable with a green plastic coating. I see previous posters have noted that possible damage to the trees may result; there are some precautions you can take to minimize that.
--
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Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
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Larry W wrote:

Like make a large loop of wide webbing around the tree, with the cable attached to the loop. That allows to tree to grow without getting strangled.
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Pieces of industrial strength hose do well, as do split tires. I'm not sure what type of webbing you are suggesting.
Steve
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