Replacing wood fence sections

I need to replace several sections of "stockade" type wood privacy fence. They are rotted and falling apart. I've tried temp fixes, but they're so bad there's nothing for screw or nails to grab onto.
The posts seem okay, I can't rock them at all, and they are solid at ground level (tried stabbing them with a screwdriver). So it seems to be just the picket sections that are bad.
Is this something a lone female can accomplish? I can handle tools, repairs, etc, but my main problem with projects is having the muscle. Or would this be a two person job?
Also, would it be better to use screws to attach the new sections, or is that overkill, and nails are enough?
I would like to say thanks for all the good folks that take time to answer here. This group has helped me in many ways since becoming a single homeowner four years ago. When I was married, my ex and I worked on many projects together. However of course I've come across projects on my older house that were never an issue when married. This group is a great source of info.
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Are you going to rebuild from scratch or put in pre-fabricated sections? Either way, it would be hand to have a helper to hodl things. If yo are putting in sections, I'd definitly want someone to give a hand. The size adn weight makes it awkward to handle for one person. Propping up on blocks may help though.

I'd use stainless screws.
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I'm still undecided about buying prefab sections or not. If I go with sections, they cost more & I'll have to pay for delivery. If I buy the pieces, can probably get them home in my car, even if I have to make 2 trips.....there's 2 home stores within 3 miles of my house. But then, I'm out of work at the moment, so I have more time than money right now, LOL.
Just for the heck of it, here's some pix. First the entire fence:
http://img143.imageshack.us/img143/6561/fence1mk6.jpg The big old tree causes the most problems. It loses dead branches/limbs during every t-storm, and many times the branches take out a piece of the fence. If the fence wasn't rotted, it would prolly hold up better. Also, it clogs the garage gutters and the shade lets moss grow on north-facing side of garage roof. Ideally, it's time to take out the tree, but that's way beyond my budget.
Close-up example of rot:
http://img178.imageshack.us/img178/2605/fence2nn9.jpg All the pickets are soft like this. I am guessing the original wood was not pressure treated. I have no idea of fence age; the city has no permit records showing a fence. Last permit issued was 1964, to build the garage.....I checked into this before I bought the place. These days, fences require a permit.
For a laugh, here's one of my ugly temp fixes. I used some scrap house trim left in garage by previous owner. I broke it into small pieces along the finger joints. Now I know why guys like to save leftover wood....these spare pieces are a lifesaver!
http://img292.imageshack.us/img292/9666/fence3ld6.jpg
This fix is ugly, but it works and it's on my side, so my neighbors don't have to look at it. Also, I learned frrom my ex and other men I know...when I became single and bought this place, on speculation I kept most of the wood scraps that were left here.
Now I understand there's a "method to the madness". I've used scrap wood, wire & metal for all sorts of things in the last few years. So all you hoarders have a convert, ha ha.
wrote:

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This will be quicker with another person to help but it can be done solo using screws and nails. Use short blocks of 2x4 in place of the other person.
Working one section at a time, screw the blocks to the posts just below the horizontal stringer boards. Remove everything except the posts. Obtain new stringer boards to span the gap between the posts and rest on the blocks. Screw the boards to the posts and remove the blocks. For an 8' gap, you need about 25 1x4x6 pickets. Have these delivered. Using a level, re-install the pickets with 5-penny galvanized, ring-shank nails. Done

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Great idea, using the chunks of 2x4 to mark the spot and support new stringers, thanks.
You also made me realize that 4" wide pickets would go up faster, versus the 2.5 inch pickets that are there now. Since I'm replacing the entire fence, no reason to stay with same size.
Any opinions on plastic lumber/vinyl fence products? I realize they cost more, are they worth it compared to pressure-treated standard wood?
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LJ wrote:

I wouldn't want a 6' plastic privacy fence too much plastic you know...it would become an elephant standing around that's alot of recycled milk jugs to look at
with wood you get the warmth and inner fuzzy feeling that wood offers
wood can be made to last a lifetime if you keep it treated
after you install the treated lumber, let it dry for a season catch it on a nice dry period, where you feel sure no moisture is in the wood spray a wood preservative on it... it will maintain it's natural color and not turn brown. do this once a year.. this is also going to add beauty and value your property (I like using deck boards for the fabric or pickets)
I like using the better cuts lumber suppliers offer, most offer 2 grades of lumber , so for a few dimes more you get a much nicer looking board, which is less work installing.. every board you put your hand on is useable.. you're not ducking twisted and warped boards see... it's all good. (normally)
I enjoy working with the finest materials I can get.
I also like being selective as to which side of the board will face out, as well as where the board will go in the whole scheme, in other words, you wouldnt' want a big black knot on the front side neccessarily. but with better cuts, you won't see very much of that.
Im sure you know.. spray/brush on preservatives come in colors too woo woo
why not consider this.. use a 1 5/4" x 6" deck board for each picket, use coated or vinyl coated screws... 2 per stringer, consider a 4th stringer... (tighter to the top, tighter to the bottom) or not!
around here, it's cheaper to buy a 12 foot, 1 5/4" x 6" treated deck board, and cut it in half, than it is to buy one 3/4" a 6" dog eared fence board.. which is more than fine and can still last a life time, but do expect some of them to curl and pull in about 4 years.
a deckboard is going to look robust... with preservatives it's going to last a lifetime..
don't forget to waste money on screw in finials for each post!
figure about 50 - 60 bux for nice gate or drive-gate hardware.
post pics?
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Here's a money-saving idea: Replace ONLY the horizontal boards.
Most of the cost of a fence is the vertical pickets. The posts, concrete and horizontal boards are a much smaller percentage of the cost. You may have to replace a few complete pickets, but the rotten back side of the existing pickets need not be an issue.
You have 3 horizontal boards - top, middle, bottom. For middle and bottom, ADD a treated 2x4 ABOVE the existing horizontal board. For the top board, add it BELOW the existing board.
I recommend that you attach pickets to the new boards using screws OR a pneumatic nailer. NOT a hammer. There is still some life in the pickets - there is NO life in the horizontal stringers. Use 4" deck screws to drive through the picket, new stringer and into the post.
Once the new stringers are in place and the pickets attached to them, GENTLY remove the old dead stringers without breaking the pickets. Save you a bundle it will.
I use 1-7/8" RS EG gun nails for the pickets and 3" RS HDG framing nailer nails going into the posts. Deck screws rated for PT lumber into the posts and stringers can be substituted if you do not have access to pneumatic nailing equipment. DO NOT use too long a fastener through the pickets, otherwise you will need to grind off protruding nail/screw points on the back side. DAMHIKT.
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Working alone, I find that a large C clamp is helpful in these situations.
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