Replacing propane tank regulators every dozen years? Where?

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On Fri, 4 Oct 2013 12:49:45 +0000 (UTC), Eddie Powalski

the explosive limit.
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On 10/4/2013 3:26 AM, saman wrote:

the reason to bleed lines is because the slug of air in the line may put out pilot lights, and some homeowners don't know to check, or how to relight.
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On 10/4/2013 9:47 AM, chaniarts wrote:

turn the tank off before traveling and turn it on when you stop for the night. Every time you turn the gas back on you have to bleed the air out of the gas line. Sometimes it can take a whole minute!
Paul
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On Fri, 04 Oct 2013 11:26:02 -0700, Paul Drahn wrote:

How do you actually do the bleeding?
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On 10/4/2013 11:35 AM, Alex Gunderson wrote:

on one of the burners and begin pressing the lighter. When the air is out of the line, the gas will light. Do the same with the other burners.
The oven is the same way, except it does have a pilot light that will stay lit after there is gas and not air.
the gas water heater will attempt to light automatically for a short time while waiting for gas. It no gas, you have to switch it off and then back on. Usually lights on the second try.
The gas fridge is the same way as the water heater.
The gas furnace is the same way.
All but the kitchen range is vented outside, so you have to be sure the fan is running when you purge the air.
Paul
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On Fri, 4 Oct 2013 18:35:39 +0000 (UTC), Alex Gunderson

through. When you connect a bottle to a new BarBQ you open the valve and start clicking the lighter. When the air is bled and the gas hits the burner, it lights.
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On 10/4/2013 11:26 AM, Paul Drahn wrote:

no, not everyone who owns a house has an rv with heating.
this is probably a requirement by the weevil lawyers, so they can't easily be blamed for houses blowing up when a homeowner, who may never have lit the pilot on their water heater, doesn't discover that it's not lit. it may also be leftover from many years ago when there were not self-igniting heaters.
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On Fri, 04 Oct 2013 11:26:02 -0700, Paul Drahn

just shutting it off
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On Fri, 04 Oct 2013 09:47:45 -0700, chaniarts wrote:

If that's the case, it's not so "dangerous" then.
The propane company makes it sound like the house will lift off its foundation if they don't replace the regulator themselves.
If it's just that a pilot light can go out, I can easily solve that. In fact, the furnaces don't have pilot lights. The stove doesn't have a pilot light. The pool doesn't have a pilot light. The generator doesn't have a pilot light...
So, about the only thing that has a pilot light is probably just the hot water heaters (and even that has some kind of mechanism to light it by pressing a button down or something).
So, is it this simple? A. Shut the valves in this order ... ... the pool (which is furthest from the tank) ... the hot water heaters (which is next furthest) ... the house (which is outside at the foundation) ... the generator (which is closest to the tank) B. Replace the two tank regulators C. Open the valves in this order ... ... the pool ... the hot water heaters ... the house ... the generator D. Check the hot-water heater pilot light.
Is "bleeding" that simple? Or did I miss a step?
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On 10/4/2013 11:32 AM, Alex Gunderson wrote:

there may be a bleed screw that needs to be opened, like when they refill bbq tanks. i haven't seen every regulator there is, although i didn't notice one on my 1st stage regulator that i took apart.
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On Fri, 04 Oct 2013 12:12:53 -0700, chaniarts wrote:

Well, luckily I have the PDF for the regulators, and, I'm sure a *new* regulator comes with instructions (for your $100), so, the bleeding of the regulator I'm not worried about.
It's this magical? bleeding of the gas lines.
Seems to me, there is no real bleeding step - but then - why did the gas company make it seem like it was illegal for me to replace my own regulator?
The darn things just screw off and screw on for heaven's sake.
There's just this question of bleeding ... ... ...
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There was no transposition. You can't transpose a single digit, since a transposition is a reversal of 2 or more items.
The "588" in the manual vs. the "558" at the website is nothing more than a typo or (not likely) a number that has since changed.
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