replacing gas dryer.... replace hookup too?

Page 1 of 2  
I am replacing my 9 year old gas dryer. I am considering replacing the flexible gas hookup when I replace the dryer. I was wondering whether that was recommended or is the lifetime of the hookup much longer? It has not been flexed more than once or twice in the past 9 years. I've never done a gas hookup before. Other than not smoking and turning off pilot lights, any other suggestions? Is anything used to seal the threads? I remember some discussion over the use of teflon tape with gas connections some time ago.
Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Art spake thus:

No need to replace the flex hose if, as you say, it hasn't been flexed much.
Use teflon tape on the compression fitting threads.
That's all.
--
Napoleon won the battle of Waterloo. The German Wehrmacht won World War
II. The United States won in Vietnam, and the Soviets in Afghanistan.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 19 Sep 2006 00:47:57 GMT, "Art"

I would not replace the flex and I would NOT use tape.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DK spake thus:

Why not tape?
--
Napoleon won the battle of Waterloo. The German Wehrmacht won World War
II. The United States won in Vietnam, and the Soviets in Afghanistan.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Art wrote:

least a shut-off valve inline with the dryer hookup !
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There is a shut off at the dryer, of course.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In some areas, the code does not allow flex hose on dryers because, over time, vibration can cause leaks. I've not checked for a number of years and maybe things have changed. Personally, I'd take out the flex and hard pipe it. At the very least, I'd replace it.
As for doing the work, no need to turn off pilot lights. You should have a gas valve right at the dryer to turn off. If you do not, get a pro to do the job right.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I would definetely replace the line since over the years several redesigns have been made. they tend to leak over time from vibration and flexing.
its a small cost and if you get the dryer delivered and hooked up a new line is required.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Ain't that damn near impossible to do in most cases? The vast majority of gas stoves, and dryers go in locations where without a flex connection, you;d never get it in.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Stove can have flex. They don't vibrate like a dryer or other motorized appliance can.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I reviewed several sites which discussed dryer installation. They actually recommended that flex pipe be used BECAUSE of the vibration from the dryer. And definitely used in areas prone to earthquakes (not where I live, fortunately).
Of course some sites had dubious advice like using sheet metal screws to secure venting. Screws can catch lint and that of course can lead to plugging and fire.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

We just installed a Maytag. The instructions are very explicit about NOT using vinyl vent hose, and NOT using screws.
The installer noticed I had a chunk of metal flex vent for our install, and said that the stuff I had would plug up pretty quickly too. He suggested Proflex.
Rigid won't work in our case. Unfortunately.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It\'s not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I just did a google search on Proflex. Must be one of the most common product names around. Covers everything from a toy, to a vitamin supplement to everything in between. Could not find a vent though.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Just found it at http://www.dundasjafine.com/products/proflex/index.html
That stuff is not recommended by some because walls are soft and foil like. There is flexible hard walled duct work available that is better.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It was recommended to us because our vent was rather awkwardly placed, and that only Proflex would follow the route without having the dryer objectionably far out from the wall. The fact that it's soft doesn't matter much if you're not going to be physically abusing it. "Foil-like" means that it'll catch less lint.
The stuff I had at the time, which was also a coil-like", is much more rigid (coils much closer together). The problem with that stuff is that the interior was very rough, and would capture dust like crazy, and can't bend as sharply - requiring the dryer to be a few inches further out from the wall.
Ultimately, the equipment in that room is going to be rearranged, and I'm hoping I can use ordinary rigid vent for a straight shot out the back.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It\'s not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I believe that the risk from the foil like stuff is sagging which makes the duct narrow. Similar to vinyl duct problem but not as bad. We actually are using the foil stuff in our installation right now but I am hoping to replace it with something better. I've made sure that the foil duct is fully supported and can't sag. So far when I've checked there is absolutely no lint in there over the last 9 years.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I just replaced a 15 year old gas cooktop. Everything I read, including the label on the old flexible line and the installation instructions for the new cooktop, advised strongly against re-using the old flex line.
Will the old one still work? Very probably. Are you taking an avoidable risk of problems and/or safety issues? Absolutely. I'd suggest that you buy a new one -- they're not terribly expensive.
Yes, you should use tape or pipe sealant. It should be rated for gas. Your local hardware store can probably advise you what to use for compliance with *your* local codes (I believe some codes require gas rated pipe sealant only).
--
|~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~|
| Malcolm Hoar "The more I practice, the luckier I get". |
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Malcolm Hoar spake thus:

Well, maybe you can tell me, since I asked the question up above but haven't gotten a reply yet: since when can you not use regular old teflon tape for any gas joints? I've always used it, with absolutely zero problems.
--
Napoleon won the battle of Waterloo. The German Wehrmacht won World War
II. The United States won in Vietnam, and the Soviets in Afghanistan.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, it will probably work just fine and certainly provide a more leak-proof joint that not using any tape or sealant. You're going to perform a quick leak test anyway, right? ;-)
However, a more definitive answer depends on:
1. The type of teflon tape. My local Home Depot sells pink tape for water and (heavier) yellow tape for gas.
2. Codes and/or recommendations vary according to the type of gas too (natural .v. LP) and even the fittings.
3. Where you live and what specific codes apply. In some states (Mass) a licensed plumber/fitter *must* install each and every appliance.
If you want to avoid local code violation problems down the road (i.e. if you try and sell your house) I'd ask at the local hardware store or ask a friendly plumber/fitter.
My local store told me the local inspectors around here prefer gas rated pipe sealant. The guy seemed pretty credible so that's what I used.
--
|~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~|
| Malcolm Hoar "The more I practice, the luckier I get". |
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Well I don't know what the previous plumber used to seal the threads but using 12 inch wrenches and even a hammer to knock the wrench end a few times, I have not been able to get the old flexible pipe off the dryer. The internal dryer connection loosened and the residue gas leaked out but the flexible connection and the next connector won't budge. And yes, I am turning it in the correct direction and tried in the opposite direction too to try to loosen it. The guy who installed it was a real jerk (the store admitted it 9 years ago when I complained about some other work he did at my house installing a dryer) so I suspect he sealed the threads with something he wasn't supposed to knowing that he would never have to come back. The other end of the connector at the gas turn off is just as bad though that one I would never torque too hard. I will leave it to a pro. I suspect it will take a torch to get it off. Or maybe a 3 foot pipe for more leverage.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.