Replacing a Whole House Water Filter Way too Frequently

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http://www.epa.gov/safewater/privatewells/faq.html
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DarMan wrote:

If this was a problem with a new well I would have expected the opposite. that is filter clogging very quickly and getting better and better as time progressed.
If there was a lot of sediment shown on the filter a courser prefilter would be a good idea.
You seem to be indicating a lot of very fine particulate matter which tends to stay in suspension.
I would take a water sample and get it tested. Your local health department may be able to do it for you.
Once you identify the material causing the problem you can start searching for the right solution. It might be practicle to filter only your kitchen faucets and leave the others unfiltered.
The only whole house filter I have ever used was about 3 feet long and 8 inches across. Washed down every 3-6 months and changed annually.
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marks542,
That is a good synopsis/analysis of the situation, and a good course of action to pursue.
Thanks.
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DarMan wrote:

I would agree with the others that say to get the water tested. You might hire a professional other than the driller to help you analyze the situation. Of course it doesn't hurt to talk to the driller.
How was the well drilled? "Air rotary"? or did he using "drilling mud"? If the latter, there may be a lot of drilling mud (which I believe is mostly clay) that is clogging your filter. Clay will clog filters real fast. It could be that a higher water table after your rains washed some mud that was previously above the water line into the well.
Again, I (like most others here) am just guessing. If you can't figure it out yourself, hire a professional.
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Thanks for all the perspectives. I definately have several avenues to pursue.
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First, I would consider a large water storage tank. You know, like those sitting beside a windmill. 500 gal or more. Above ground if possible.
That would let the water sediment settle out before you pipe it into your house. Then only filter the sink water.
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Filtering only the sink water will still allow sediment to get through to other parts of the plumbing. Auto fill halves for heaters, fill valves on toilets. will all be affected. Over time, the abrasiveness of the sediment will cause pre-mature wearing of seals and seats. The real solution is to find the problem and fix it. I had a problem with rust in the town water. I'd replace faucet seals every six months until I put in a filter, now they last for years, many years as not one has needed replacing in over 15 years. Quite a difference.
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wrote:

And how large was you storage tank - which lets the sediment settle to the bottom?
The problem is sediment in the water, and the solution is a large storage tank.
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I have no tank. 'City water. I'm at the end of the line and get all the crap. Five filters a year solved my problem much easier than a 500 gallon tank.
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If anyone is interested in the progress of this problem. Here's an update:
I contacted Culligan, and they came out to do a water test. The gentleman who did the test is very confident we are suffering from "colloidal clay" (which is pretty much liquified clay). Also, the water is a bit acidic (5.8) and hard (3gpg). He is taking a sample to their lab for confirmation, but he's pretty sure this is what it is.
He said that the causes for this point, most likely, to a problem with how the well was drilled. Either the casing down the well is cracked, or the well was dug a bit larger than the casing, but either way ground water is coming down and gettinng into the well. He said that the water is prematurely getting in the well from above somehow because these results (except hardness) don't usually occur naturally at this depth of well.
The solution is either to install a Reverse Osmosis filtering system or dig a new well.
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"I contacted Culligan, and they came out to do a water test .... The solution is either to install a Reverse Osmosis filtering system or dig a new well."
That doesn't sound right. Your current filter is doing it's job. Another filter will plug up just the same. And, if it is surface water then it's undoubtedly carrying bacteria as well. Have you had the water tested for coliform bacteria?
It's interesting how a water filtration company would recommend a new high dollar water filter.
-rev
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Rev,
I'm very well aware of the conflict of interest. :) Although, he actually suggested to pursue investigating the well first, before going down the road of the expensive filter, which has to count for something.
Actually, in the two weeks since starting this thread, the whole house filter hasn't become clogged at all, but the water is extremely cloudy. So, I'd have to disagree that the filter is doing it's job. If we really are dealing with colloidal clay, it is so fine its almost a homogeneous solution (its not, but the question is what sort of physical filter would be needed to extract it where I wouldn't have to change that filter every other day?).
The water is being tested by a different lab even as we speak.
Thanks.
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